Message from the Dean |  Mission Statement | Support South Texas Join Us On Facebook! twitter
 
 




• Mission Statement
• Senior Administrators
• History of South Texas
• City of Houston
• Student Body
• Location and Maps
• How to Contact Us

 

History of South Texas College of Law

Welcome to this historical look at South Texas College of Law. We have compiled a chronology of important events, interesting happenings, and periods of change in the school's history. As with any project of this type, this record of historical highlights is a work in progress. Please help us fill in the details as we celebrate our past. This chronological perspective is a great way to see how important South Texas has been to the Houston community, to the state of Texas, to the legal community, and to the many students who have passed through the college's doors. We hope you enjoy this travel through time.

The links in this table will take you to each year's events at South Texas. You can use the "Back" button in your Web browser to return to this table. Use your Web browser's "Find" feature (it's typically under the "Edit" menu) to locate a specific event. This is a very large page; if you experience problems, try reloading the page and give it time to load completely.

Conceiving a Law School, 1915-23
1923 1924 1927 1928 1931 1932 1933 1935 1937 1939
1941 1942 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952
1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972
1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982
1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992
1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011  

Deans of South Texas College of Law
  • Judge Joseph C. Hutcheson, Jr. (1923-31)
  • Judge Sam Streetman (1931-33)
  • Edgar E. Townes, Sr. (1933-60)
  • John C. Jackson (1960-68)
  • Garland R. Walker (1968-84)
  • William J. Williamson (1984-89)
  • William L. Wilks (1989-95)
  • Frank T. Read (1995- 2003)
  • James J. Alfini (2003-2009)
  • Donald J. Guter (fall 2009)

lPursuant to the YMCA's 1886 constitution, which called for the organization to engage in educational endeavors, the Houston YMCA considered opening a law school in Houston.

1915. H. D. "Guy" Burnett, Houston attorney and graduate of the YMCA Law School of Cincinnati, Ohio, began teaching YMCA evening law classes. The program sought to "provide an opportunity for men to take up the study of law without interfering with their daily work."

Gavin Ulmer, who would serve as associate dean at South Texas, and who taught at the YMCA, said that the idea of a law school came from several of his students. The program was interrupted in 1917 by World War I.

^Top^

 

1923 -- Opening South Texas

March 31. The YMCA Educational Committee and the Board of Governors of the School of Technology jointly recommended that the YMCA Board of Directors establish a law school.

April 13. The South Texas School of Law was founded to provide working people with an opportunity to obtain a legal education in the evening or after working hours. The college became a part of the United YMCA Schools under the control of the Houston YMCA. Its offices and classrooms were housed in three rooms on the third floor of the YMCA building at the corner of Fannin and McKinney streets.

May 8. The Advisory Council met for the first time and unanimously named Judge Joseph C. Hutcheson, Jr., as dean of the law school. Judge Hutcheson was selected in recognition of his "leadership in great things."

September 24. The college opened its doors. South Texas began with seven part-time instructors, who represented some of the "most successful lawyers and ablest judges of the Houston Bar." The curriculum and other programs of the law school were modeled after those of the University of Texas. The only difference would be that South Texas would offer classes in the evening rather than only during the day, as conventional law schools, such as the University of Texas, did.

The first class consisted of 34 "freshman" students, five of whom were women. Only 11 of the original 34 students graduated from the four-year course. Addressing the newly formed South Texas community, Dean Hutcheson stated, "We will promise nothing now as to what we will fulfill, for we believe that we can do much more than we can now promise." Classes were held in only one room, which contained wooden fans suspended from the ceilings, and chairs with arms that served as desks.

About the college's opening ceremonies, O. O. Bennett, director of the YMCA's Educational Department, wrote in his October 12, 1923, "Educational Report":

"The opening of South Texas School of Law . . . was an occasion worthy of the attention of the educators of the state and members of the Bar Association particularly.

"No class in recent years has opened under more auspicious conditions as the Law School. The Board of Governors had complete charge of the opening program. Judge L. R. Bryan, Chairman of the Board, presided. In the absence of Judge Hutcheson, the Dean, who was in New York City at the time, Judge Sam Streetman made the opening address to the student body.

"The speaker and guest of the evening was Judge John C. Townes, former dean and now Professor of Law at the University of Texas. His masterly address and presence on that occasion gave the stamp of approval of the leading educational institution of the state to the South Texas School of Law."

^Top^


1924 -- "A High Grade Night School"

South Texas promoted itself as a "high grade night law school." The tuition was $85 a semester, and students relied largely on the nearby Harris County Law Library. The law school, though, was developing its own library, mainly through donations, and had approximately six hundred volumes. South Texas also began offering dormitory rooms for out-of-town students.

^Top^

 


1927 -- The First Alumni

June 1. South Texas graduated its first class -- 11 students who received the LL.B. degree. E. S. Morris wrote in the "Class History": "Our association with the school . . . has been . . . most beneficial, interesting, and enjoyable, and it seems that it was only yesterday since the beginning of our journey." Commencement was held in the Woodrow Wilson School Auditorium at Yupon and Maryland.

August 8. The Alumni Association was organized. Its officers were William K. Hall, president; Glenn M. Green, vice president; and E. S. Morris, secretary.

^Top^

1928 -- "A Greater Law School for the Greater Houston"

The school library was enhanced with the addition of the Southwestern Reporter and Digests and the Vernon's Annotated Texas Statutes. South Texas now had what was considered a "good working library."

May 31. Ann Marie Hollenberg was the first woman to graduate from South Texas School of Law; eight men graduated with her. Commencement was held in the auditorium of the Taylor School, with C. S. Bradley, chairman of the Board of Directors for the State Bar of Texas, giving the commencement address. Foster Bean was valedictorian of the class.

November 21. South Texas received accreditation from the Supreme Court of Texas. The court said in part:

"With the above recognition, the South Texas School of Law enters a new era. It assumes new responsibilities, it is true, but no change of standards is required. The recognition is based upon its record of past performance. The Board of Governors, Faculty, and Officers saw to it at the very first, that the entrance requirements, curriculum, method of instruction, and student work required, were of such high standard as to deserve just the recognition that has naturally come to the school. The exemption from the bar examination is of little moment. The recognition of this grade of instruction offered, is all important."

The law school either met or exceeded the requirements set forth by the Carnegie Foundation on Legal Education, and exceeded state statutory requirements.

^Top^

1932 -- New Requirements Imposed

The Supreme Court made a high school education or its equivalent mandatory, and all applicants were required to file a "written declaration of present intention to begin the study of law" at least two years before planning to take the bar examination.

^Top^

 

1933 -- A New Deal and New Challenges

Spurgeon Bell became an adjunct professor as a substitute for his father, Judge Holland E. Bell, who was teaching at South Texas at the time.

November. Dean Streetman died unexpectedly. E. E. Townes, Sr., was installed as the new dean of the college.

^Top^

 

1935 -- "A First in Continuing Education"

Dean E. E. Townes, Sr., established the Oil and Gas Lecture Series.

June. The Shingle Club, a student social organization, was established.

^Top^

 

1937 -- The Challenge of New Standards

The YMCA began fund-raising to build a new central building.

July 1. The Texas Supreme Court abolished the diploma privilege, which had allowed graduates of several Texas law schools, including South Texas, an exemption from taking the state bar examination. Hereafter, all applicants to the bar were required to pass the bar examination.

^Top^

 

1939-- "Studying Law in a World on the Verge"

Professor Dick Hoskins Gregg began teaching at South Texas School of Law.

^Top^

 

1941 -- The College Moves

South Texas accompanied the YMCA when the Y moved to its new building at 1600 Louisiana Street.

Professor William J. Williamson first began teaching at South Texas as an adjunct professor. Williamson taught Oil and Gas, and was also asked by Professor Spurgeon Bell to complete the course Bell had begun teaching, Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure. Professor Bell had been called to become an attorney with the Court of Criminal Appeals in Austin.

^Top^

 

1942 -- War Years

The average class size during World War II was about 33 students.

^Top^

 

1945 -- Name Change for a New Era

South Texas School of Law changed its name to South Texas College of Law.

South Texas began offering a "refresher" course for veterans whose legal education was interrupted by World War II.

Fall. South Texas enrolled 99 students, making it larger than the University of Texas School of Law for the first time.

^Top^

 

1946 -- GI Law Students

The college was approved for training veterans under the GI Bill of Rights, which provided veterans a college education at government expense. The veterans also received a monthly subsistence wage if not working full-time.

South Texas began offering career placement services.

^Top^

 

1947 -- The College's First Full-Time Instructor

John Hume, a graduate of Harvard Law School, became the first full-time instructor at South Texas.

^Top^

 

1948 -- A Companion School

The YMCA opened the South Texas Junior College, a sister school to the law school that later became the University of Houston-Downtown.

^Top^

1949 -- A Quarter-Century of Progress

The college established a more stringent prelaw requirement. Incoming students were required to have at least 60 semester hours from an accredited college or university on the baccalaureate level to enter South Texas.

The YMCA adopted a metropolitan form of organization. The law school became a branch of the Y.

Anthony F. Crapitto (1946) became president of the Ex-Students Association. Four hundred students attended South Texas College of Law in the spring semester.

June 4. A banquet was held to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the college. Mark Edwin Andrews (1935), former instructor and former assistant secretary of the Navy, addressed the gathering with a speech entitled "Pride -- The Essential Ingredient."

^Top^

 

1950 -- Acknowledging Excellence in Scholarship

E. Virginia A. Barnett (1946) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

January. The Ex-Students Association offered the Valedictory Award to "recognize and commend excellence in scholarship among future members."

June 12. The Ex-Students Association became incorporated as a Texas corporation.

^Top^

1951 -- Rice Institute President Speaks at South Texas

Luther E. Nisbet (1939) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

January 29. Val Jean McCoy, area training representative for Shell Oil Company, was the commencement speaker at winter graduation, which was held in the YMCA Assembly Hall.

June 4. Dr. W. V. Houston, president of the Rice Institute, was the commencement speaker at spring graduation, which was also held in the YMCA Assembly Hall.

^Top^

1952 -- South Texas Grows in Size and Increases Its Standards

South Texas, in terms of enrollment, had become the second-largest law school in Texas.

E. R. Adam (1936) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

January 28. Senator Searcy Bracewell was the commencement speaker at winter graduation, which was held in the YMCA Assembly Hall.

June. Candidates for the LL.B. at South Texas were required to complete 80 semester hours of instruction (up from the previous 72 hours).

October 8. The Ex-Students Association of South Texas held its annual meeting, in which it elected officers. Assistant Dean Gavin Ulmer spoke briefly at the meeting.

^Top^

 

1953 -- Launching a Journal

January 1. Margaret Walford (1948) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

June 1. John Ben Sheppard, Texas attorney general, was the commencement speaker at spring graduation, which was held in the Taylor School Auditorium, located at 1500 Louisiana Street.

Fall Semester. The South Texas Law Journal was established. The journal was the only standard law review in the United States that was edited entirely by the students of an evening law school. The first "sponsor" of the journal was Professor Herman Mead, and Clair Getty, Jr. (1956), was the first editor-in-chief. The journal was published quarterly.

September 1. William P. Hamblen (1930) became the first South Texas alumnus to serve as a state appellate court justice.

^Top^

 

1954 -- The Accreditation Controversy

Hon. William A. Miller (1936) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

January 1. The Texas Supreme Court adopted a rule stating that law students must graduate from an ABA-accredited law school in order to take the Texas bar exam. All law schools were required to have ABA accreditation by January 1, 1956. Dean Townes led South Texas supporters in opposition to this rule.

February 1. The Texas Supreme Court rescinded its order requiring ABA accreditation, but subsequently issued a new set of rules governing law school accreditation, substantially the same as those of the ABA but enforced through the court's own inspectors. Dean Townes persuaded John E. Hickman of the Supreme Court to grant an extension to the college so that it could meet the new standards implemented by the court.

May 28. Hon. Roy C. Archer, chief justice of the Court of Civil Appeals of the Third Supreme Judicial District, was the commencement speaker at spring graduation, which was held in the Prudential Auditorium at 1100 Holcombe Boulevard. Archer's speech was entitled "Considered Decisions."

^Top^

 

1955 -- A Growing Law School

The college's faculty included three full-time professors, which met the new standards of the Texas Supreme Court.

Edna McDonald became president of the Ex-Students Association.

^Top^

 

1956 -- A New Fraternity Represents the College

By 1956, South Texas had met all of the ABA's library requirements.

July 29. The Edgar E. Townes Senate of Delta Theta Phi National Legal Fraternity was chartered.

South Texas had 335 students.

^Top^

 

1957 -- The ABA Inspects the College

The SBA donated an air conditioner to the library's reading room, which accommodated 85 students.

Julie Mae Barnhart (1949) became president of the Ex-Students Association. The association held regular luncheon meetings each month in the Lamar Hotel mezzanine. The official publication of the Association was the South Texan.

June. John Hervey of the ABA inspected the college.

June 3. Newton Gresham was the commencement speaker at graduation, held at River Oaks Baptist Church.

July 5. South Texas hosted a breakfast at the annual convention of the State Bar of Texas to recognize lawyers who had practiced for 50 years or more.

October 9. Judge William P. Hamblen (1930), former chief justice of the First Texas Court of Civil Appeals, spoke on "The Legal Aspects of School Integration" at an alumni luncheon meeting.

November 22. The Ex-Students Association held its ninth annual homecoming at the Ben Milam Hotel's "Insurance Club." The homecoming event would eventually evolve into an annual event now known as the Spring Dinner Dance or, affectionately, as the "Prom."

^Top^

 

1958 -- "Remaining the 'Downtown Law School' "

South Texas declined an attractive offer to move from downtown to the Schlumberger property at 2700 Leeland. The college declined the offer because it believed that South Texas had an ideal location for working students (which made up a majority of the student body at the time), and because it was within walking distance of the city, county, state, and federal courts in Houston.

The college offered a course in patent law for the first time.

Conway L. Wallace (1949) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

December 6. The annual South Texas Homecoming and Dance, which celebrated the 35th anniversary of the college, was held at the Ben Milam Hotel's "Insurance Club."

^Top^

1959-- South Texas Receives Provisional ABA Accreditation

Four full-time professors and 25 adjunct professors served on the faculty.

The South Texas Student Bar Association became the 125th affiliate of the American Law Students Association.

Felix M. Stanley (1949) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

February 25. South Texas unanimously received provisional accreditation from the ABA House of Delegates at the ABA's midyear meeting in Chicago.

May 30. The Samuel Houston Chapter of the Phi Alpha Delta National Legal Fraternity was chartered. Its founder and first justice, C. Raymond Judice (1961), would later serve as president of the Ex-Students Association.

November 13. The annual South Texas Homecoming Dinner Dance was held at the Houston Executive Club (the old Houston Country Club). Entertainment was provided by Tommy Joplin and his nine-piece orchestra.

^Top^

 

1960 -- Dean Jackson Assumes the Helm

Saying the "school is in good shape," Dean Townes retired and was elected dean emeritus. John C. Jackson became the first full-time dean of the college. Jackson came to South Texas upon retiring after 25 years of service as general counsel of the Texas Company (now Texaco, Inc.). Dean Jackson had also previously lectured on oil and gas law at South Texas.

South Texas competed in the Texas State Moot Court Competition for the first time. The college placed second and won the award for the best written brief.

The Law School Board of Regents voted to incorporate the law school separately from the YMCA.

Carl T. Denson, Jr. (1953), became president of the Ex-Students Association.

May 30. Dr. George S. Benson, president of Harding College, was the commencement speaker at graduation, held in the auditorium of Second Baptist Church.

October 29. The annual South Texas Homecoming Dinner Dance was held at the Sagewood Country Club.

^Top^

 

1961 -- Forming a Foundation

The South Texas College of Law Foundation was created.

September. The Florida Law Students Association was founded by Karl Adler (1962), Tom Speer (1962), and E. J. Salcines, Jr. (1963).

September 1. Garland R. Walker became assistant dean.

^Top^

 

1962 -- End of the Townes Era

Dean Emeritus E. E. Townes, Sr., died.

Paul D. Filer, Jr. (1959), became president of the Ex-Students Association.

^Top^

 

1963 -- LSAT Comes to South Texas

Paul E. Delcourt became president of the Ex-Students Association.

September. The LSAT became an entrance requirement at South Texas for the first time.

^Top^

 

1964 -- Under Our Own Roof

South Texas had a faculty of three full-time professors, including the dean, and had 419 students.

Arthur Lee Forbes III (1959) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

February. South Texas moved to its present location, leasing the first floor of what was then called the J. Robert Neal Building, at 1220 Polk Avenue. The college initially shared the building, which had previously housed a car dealership and later an insurance agency, with such businesses as a drapery firm.

September. The Order of the Lytae was established as the college's honorary legal fraternity. It was organized by Dr. Charles D. Reed (1965).

^Top^

 

1965-- The First J.D. Degrees in Texas!

Fall Semester. South Texas became the first law school in Texas to award the J.D. degree to its graduates.

Fall Semester. South Texas became the first law school in Texas to adopt the policy that only students who had earned a baccalaureate degree would be considered for admission. All other Texas law schools followed suit.

Hon. C. Raymond Judice (1961) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

^Top^

1966 -- The Law School Incorporates

William Shead (1959) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

May. The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Iota Tau International Legal Sorority was chartered and held its first meeting.

September. The YMCA's Metropolitan Board unanimously approved the termination of South Texas College of Law's affiliation with the YMCA effective January 1967.

December 12. The college filed articles of incorporation with the secretary of state's office.

^Top^

1967 -- South Texas Achieves "Freestanding" Status

William A. Miller, Jr. (1936), was named the first Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

The college initiated an advocacy program.

January 1. South Texas ended its association with the YMCA and the South Texas Junior College. It became, and remains, a private, nonprofit educational corporation. The school was not affiliated with any other educational institution until 1998, when it became affiliated with Texas A&M University.

Fall. Renowned defense attorney Percy Foreman addressed a meeting of the South Texas Wives Club.

Fall. South Texas formed a moot court team and offered academic credit for participation in moot court.

Fall. South Texas ranked 35th in size among all ABA-accredited law schools.

^Top^

1968 -- Dean Walker Takes Charge

John C. Jackson retired as dean and became president of the law school. Garland Walker, who had become a professor at South Texas in 1959 and an associate dean in 1960, succeeded Jackson as dean.

The SBA sponsored a ride-along program with the Houston Police Department so that students could learn how the police do their work.

Joseph M. Guarino (1949) became president of the Ex-Students Association.

Fall. A student/faculty committee was created to study the implementation of a faculty evaluation program, which was scheduled to be implemented in January 1969.

December 12. Congressman and future president George Bush spoke at South Texas about the incoming Nixon administration.

December 15. A reception in honor of the faculty was held at the Houston Garden Center at Hermann Park. The reception was sponsored by the SBA, Delta Theta Phi, Phi Alpha Delta, and Iota Tau Tau.

^Top^

1969 -- Full Accreditation

Annotations, the student newspaper, began publication on a regular basis. In previous years, the paper had appeared occasionally as a publication of the SBA.

January 28. The college became fully accredited by the ABA.

December. South Texas purchased the entire Neal building with cash, achieving ownership of its facilities for the first time.

^Top^

1970 -- South Texas Offers Seminars for the First Time

South Texas offered its first seminars on the topics of Criminal Justice and Juveniles and the Law.

February. One hundred fifty-five students were registered at South Texas, making it the second-largest law school in Texas.

Spring. The SBA proposed an objective grading plan (anonymous grading).

Fall. New seminars on Appellate Courts, Criminal Corrections, and Theology were offered by the college.

Fall. South Texas changed its schedule to a trimester system.

^Top^

1971 -- South Texas Offers New Internships

Joe M. Green, Jr. (1938), was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

The Calvin Alpha Moot Court Award was offered for the first time to the national moot court team representing South Texas College of Law.

The Continental Bank Award was offered for the first time as a monetary award to each student who was a member of the team representing the law school in the annual State Bar of Texas moot court competition.

January. The college initiated the first criminal law internship in Texas, with the cooperation of the Harris County District Attorney's Office and two Houston defense attorneys. Professor Ray Moses directed the criminal internship program for the college. South Texas also initiated civil practice internships under the direction of Professor John Ensle.

^Top^

1972-- Planning for a Landmark Anniversary

In 1972, South Texas had 773 currently enrolled students. By 1972, more than 7,000 students had received all or part of their legal education at South Texas. Also, approximately 500 lawyers in the 3,000-member Houston Bar Association had attended South Texas.

E. J. Salcines (1963) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

The South Texas College of Law Quarterly began publication.

The Law Professor and Prosecutor Exchange Project, a cooperative venture of South Texas College of Law and the Harris County District Attorney's Office, began.

The college unveiled a new logo.

March 23. The Ex-Students Association, led by its temporary chair, Judge Joseph Guarino (1949), was reorganized and changed its name to the South Texas Alumni Association. Philip G. Warner (1965) was elected president of the association.

April 22. South Texas students held their annual awards banquet at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel.

June 3. Senfronia Thompson, a South Texas student, was elected state representative from District 89. Rep. Bob Gammage, a South Texas professor, won the Democratic primary for state senator in District 7, and Rep. Gene Jones (1968), an assistant dean, won that party's primary for state senator in District 97.

Fall. South Texas announced its 50th Anniversary Development Campaign, with Searcy Bracewell, a board member, being named to chair the campaign committee. The campaign sought to raise $1.75 million for the construction of a new three-story building, immediately adjacent to the existing Neal Building, that would double the space available to the college.

November 11. Women law students sponsored a seminar entitled "Remedies after Divorce."

December. A $25,000 grant for the law school's building and expansion program was presented by Joe M. Green, Jr. (1938), trustee of Rockwell Fund, Inc., and also a member of the college's Board of Trustees. Henry M. Rockwell, vice president of the Rockwell Fund, presented an additional gift of $5,000 from the Rockwell Brothers Endowment, Inc., in honor of Green.

^Top^

 

1973 -- South Texas Observes Its Golden Anniversary

Philip G. Warner (1965) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

Richard P. Hogan (1961) became president of the Alumni Association.

Judge Spurgeon Bell retired as chief justice of the First Court of Appeals and resigned from the college's Board of Trustees to be a full-time faculty member.

Annotations became a self-supporting publication, financed solely by outside advertising.

A memorial award was established to honor David Donnelly, an outstanding South Texas student who met an untimely death. The first recipient of the award was Jerry Weinstein (1973).

January 31. The faculty approved a voluntary teacher evaluation to begin in the spring.

Spring. Houston Endowment Inc. donated approximately $750,000 to the South Texas building campaign, which was raising funds to construct the college's three-story addition.

April 7. South Texas celebrated its 50th anniversary with a "Salute to South Texas College of Law" dinner at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel. The dinner, attended by one thousand people, featured an address by Price Daniel, Jr., speaker of the Texas House of Representatives.

May. The Board of Barristers, with the cooperation of Professor Ensle and Dean Walker, was organized with the purpose of helping to promote, organize, and run the competition for the right to represent South Texas College of Law in interschool moot court competitions.

August. An accelerated Legal Research and Writing course was offered for the first time.

Fall. Media Law was taught for the first time by Professor Paul van Slyke.

Fall. Houston mayoral candidates Fred Hofheinz, Tree Johnson, Bud Hadfield, and Dick Gottlieb spoke on campus.

September. Because the demand for lawyers was so high, the Career Placement Service was restructured to provide new services such as a weekly placement bulletin.

October 11. Dean Jackson retired as president of the college. He was succeeded by Searcy Bracewell, a partner in the Houston law firm of Bracewell & Patterson. Bracewell previously served for 16 years as a trustee of the college, for two years in the Texas House of Representatives, and for ten years in the Texas Senate.

^Top^

 

1974-- Spurgeon Bell Moot Court Competition Established

Harry P. Hutchens Jr. (1956) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

J. D. Guyon (1961) became president of the Alumni Association.

January. The SBA supported the formation of the Spurgeon E. Bell Moot Court Competition.

February. Dean Walker announced that South Texas would be the first law school in the United States to initiate a study program for the certification of trial lawyers.

March. The first Spurgeon Bell Moot Court Competition was held, which helped enhance the school's reputation in advocacy.

March 16. The first annual South Texas College of Law Golf Tournament was held at the Hermann Park Golf Course.

June 20. An informal organization of women law students was formed to help entering women students make an easier transition to law school.

July 1. Groundbreaking was set for the new three-story addition to South Texas College of Law. The new building would be named after the late Jesse H. Jones, banker, developer, owner of the Houston Chronicle, and, with his wife, Mary Gibbs Jones, founder of Houston Endowment Inc.

July 10. The first in a series of open-forum discussions was held. Professor Charles Weigel II moderated the forum, which dealt with the revision of the honor code.

Fall. The SBA initiated a legal aid clinic, which began providing legal services to indigent people in the community in conjunction with the Harris County Legal Aid Foundation.

Fall. South Texas College of Law received a $500 grant from the Law Student Division of the ABA to help the clinical program.

November 14. Dean Walker held a question-and-answer session that focused heavily on grades and grading, and specifically on the issue of whether Walker would institute and enforce a grading deadline.

^Top^

 

1975-- Groundbreaking at the Law School

South Texas had 11 full-time faculty members.

Mabel Welch became director of alumni affairs for the college.

April. The group Women in the Law was organized by the Student Bar Association.

March 1. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the law school's new three-story addition.

March 15. Noted Houston trial attorney Richard "Racehorse" Haynes spoke at the Spring Banquet.

March 28. South Texas hosted an open house to dedicate its new building.

Spring. Florida alumnus E. J. Salcines, Jr. (1963), was appointed to the Board of Trustees.

Spring. Judge Spurgeon Bell was appointed to head a probe of secret Houston Police Department files, to determine if the police were conducting inappropriate investigations. There had been public reports that the police kept records of innocent citizens, which were not related to any criminal investigation.

June 7. New orientation programs, including a "How to Study" presentation by Professor Charles Blood (1968), were held for the first time.

July. An appropriation bill rider before the Texas legislature led to speculation about a merger between South Texas College of Law and Texas A&M University. The rider, which was defeated, would have permitted a state university to contract with a law school for the legal education of its students.

Fall. Madalyn Murray O'Hair (1952), a prominent leader in the atheist movement, spoke at South Texas.

Winter. The SBA created an "old-exam file" for the first time.

December 3. SBA President Sam George (1976) spoke at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, becoming the first student to speak at a board meeting for any purpose.

^Top^

 

1976 -- The New Jesse Jones Building

The college had 15 full-time faculty members, 30 adjunct professors, and 1,035 students.

A replica of the Liberty Bell, cast by a London foundry, was purchased by an anonymous donor as a gift for South Texas to commemorate the U.S. bicentennial. The bell was one of only two such bells to be allocated by the foundry for the state of Texas.

Charles C. Cate (1969) was named president of the Alumni Association.

The Florida Alumni Association was founded.

Jane F. Yount (1958) received the Distinguished Alumna award, becoming the first woman to receive the annual award given by the Alumni Association.

January 1. Garland R. Walker was named president of the college, thus assuming the joint title of president and dean.

January 11. Dean John C. Jackson, president emeritus of South Texas, died.

March 27. South Texas hosted a "Salute to the Supreme Court of Texas and the Court of Criminal Appeals" at the Imperial Ballroom of the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Approximately 1,450 attended the dinner and dance, and John M. Lawrence III of the State Bar of Texas gave the keynote speech.

March 28. South Texas celebrated the dedication of its new three-story addition, the Jesse H. Jones Law Building, named in honor of the Houston builder and philanthropist. This building, generously funded by Houston Endowment Inc., which was founded by Jones, doubled the size of the college's physical plant. The building featured a faculty lounge, the E. E. Townes Gallery, the Joe M. Green, Jr., Advocacy Center Auditorium (seating 762 people), and new office and classroom space. An open house and champagne reception held in conjunction with the college's annual Spring Banquet was attended by approximately four thousand people, including justices from the Texas Supreme Court and Court of Criminal Appeals.

May 11. Sidney Kenton Boone, Jr., gave the commencement address at graduation, which was held at Temple Emanu-El.

July. The first student chapter in Texas of the Association of Trial Lawyers was chartered at South Texas.

Fall Semester. South Texas began the 1976-77 academic year with 13 full-time teachers.

Fall Semester. The "Semester of Advocacy" was offered, giving students the opportunity to concentrate on trial and appellate advocacy.

September 24. The Cullen Foundation approved a grant of $250,000 for the renovation of the Neal Building wing. The Neal Building was subsequently renamed the Roy and Lillie Cullen Building in recognition of the Cullen Foundation's generous support of South Texas.

October 28. Carol Vance, Harris County district attorney, was the guest speaker at Founders' Day.

November. Assistant Dean Gene Jones (1968) was elected to the state senate in the regular election, after having been elected to the senate the previous April in a special election.

November 6. At the First Annual Professional Orientation Day, 14 attorneys spoke to informal groups of students on problems and practices of law in 9 areas of specialization.

^Top^

 

1977 -- The Liberty Bell Rings Out at South Texas

Student records became computerized.

Lexis was installed in the library; South Texas was among the first law schools in the country to offer this legal-research database.

Spring Semester. The Florida Law Students Association held an ethics scholarship program for the first time.

Spring Semester. South Texas received the replica of the Liberty Bell that an anonymous donor had purchased for the school the previous year; the bell was placed on the main floor of the Jesse H. Jones Law Building. In 1984, upon completion of the "Tower" building, the bell was moved to the main floor of the Tower, where it resides today. It has become a college tradition for third-year students to ring the bell after completing their last final exam. According to college folklore, once a student initiates the ringing, the number of times the bell subsequently tolls indicates the number of times the student will take the bar before passing it.

April 2. Congresswoman Barbara Jordan was the keynote speaker at the college's Spring Banquet, held at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel. She spoke on "Citizens' Access to the Law."

April 25. The South Texas College of Law Alumni Association became chartered with the Texas secretary of state as a nonprofit charitable educational corporation.

May 15. Judge Bert Tunks, retired justice of the 14th Court of Civil Appeals, gave the commencement address at graduation, held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Advocacy Center Auditorium.

June. The Florida Law Students Association hosted Tampa Bay's first annual South Texas College of Law student-alumni luncheon.

August 26-27. Dean Garland R. Walker was named celebrated guest of honor at the first annual South Texas College of Law Florida Alumni Convention in Tampa. The mayor of Tampa presented Dean Walker with the key to the city.

Fall. Dean Walker received the 1977 Outstanding Attorney and Counselor award from the Texas Aggie Bar Association.

October. Philip Burleson Sr. (1958) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

October. William "Ben" Adair (1971) became president of the Alumni Association.

^Top^

1978 -- Treece Rejuvenates Advocacy Program

South Texas conducted its first program of on-campus employment interviews.

April. The American Bar Association Law Student Division (ABA/LSD) gave South Texas national recognition for having the highest percentage of membership, at 48.2 percent, in the organization.

April 8. Leroy Jeffers, president of the State Bar of Texas, was the keynote speaker at the Spring Banquet.

May 14. E. E. Townes, Jr., member of the Board of Trustees since 1958, delivered the commencement address on the history of the college to an audience of 1,600 at Temple Emanu-El.

Fall. Women in the Law received a $500 ABA/LSD grant to support its seminar on "Advertising and Low Cost Legal Services."

August. Professor T. Gerald Treece became director of the College's advocacy program. He had taught torts on a part-time basis at both South Texas and Bates College of Law (now the University of Houston Law Center). Under Professor Treece's leadership, the advocacy program developed as a national powerhouse.

August 20-26. South Texas and the Texas Trial Lawyers Association (TTLA) combined efforts to sponsor the creation of the Texas College of Trial Advocacy. This was a postgraduate program for trial lawyers, which continued to be cosponsored by South Texas and the TTLA through 1995.

September. The Student Advocacy Board expanded from 10 to 15 members, and Professor Treece was appointed as faculty adviser.

October. Assistant Dean Eugene Jones (1968) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

October. Patricia Lykos (1971) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 26. Dean Garland Walker and Judge Spurgeon Bell were named honorary members of the South Texas Alumni Association for the distinguished services they rendered to the college.

Winter. Rockwell Fund, Inc., donated $75,000 to South Texas College of Law for its building program.

^Top^

1979 -- The Library Expands

The Health Law Society at South Texas was founded; its first faculty sponsor was Professor Charles Weigel. Members included students who were health care professionals and those interested in the health care industry.

Spring. Addie Heaton, administrative assistant to the dean, was honored for 20 years of service to the college.

April 7. Dean Garland R. Walker announced at the Student Awards Banquet, held at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel, that Houston Endowment Inc. would donate $1 million to the South Texas building fund.

May 13. E. J. Salcines, Jr. (1963), gave the commencement speech at graduation, which was held at Temple Emanu-El.

Fall. The first Garland R. Walker Mock Trial Competition was held at South Texas.

Fall. South Texas College of Law was named as having one of the best student advocacy programs in the United States, and was invited to participate in the National Invitational Moot Court Tournament, to be held in spring 1980 on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

October. Charles R. (Bob) Dunn (1965) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year. George F. Luquette (1966) became president of the Alumni Association.

^Top^

1980 -- An Innovative Arrangement

Under an innovative arrangement between the college, the Harris County Commissioners Court, and the First and Fourteenth Courts of Appeals, the commissioners, in exchange for a 99-year lease, agreed to pay for three extra floors of a new building that South Texas was planning to construct. 

Fifty percent of Harris County's judges and one-sixth of the Houston Bar Association's members were South Texas graduates. 

South Texas won the national championship at the American Trial Lawyers Association (ATLA) Mock Trial Competition, held in Montreal, Canada. The South Texas team consisted of Joe W. Bailey II (1981), T. Lamar McCorkle (1980), and Catherine Bertrand (1980). South Texas also won the award for the best brief in the nation.

January. Patricia Lykos (1971) chose to have her judicial swearing-in at South Texas, rather than in a courtroom, to honor her alma mater.

April 19. William Reece Smith Jr., president-elect of the ABA, spoke at the Annual Student Awards Banquet, held at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel.

May 13. Charles R. (Bob) Dunn (1965) spoke at South Texas's graduation, held at Temple Emanu-El. He emphasized excellence, reputation, and appreciation as they relate to the practice of law.

Fall. The placement office reported a 300 percent increase in firms recruiting on campus over a two-year period.

Fall. A Westlaw system was purchased for the library.

Fall. South Texas College of Law interns worked at the Neighborhood Justice Clinic, a new program in Houston. The clinic, which presented an alternative to the formal court system, had begun offering mediation to resolve some civil and criminal disputes in Harris County and its vicinity.

October. Don D. Jordan (1969) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

Byron P. Davis (1972) became president of the Alumni Association.

^Top^

1981 - Plans for a New Building

South Texas won the state championship at the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition, held in Houston. The winning team consisted of Bryan Lyn McClellan (1981), Diantha J. Garrett (1981), Robert G. Oake, Jr. (1981), and Neil McCabe (1982). South Texas also won the award for best brief.

April 4. At the annual Spring Banquet, Dean Garland R. Walker announced plans for the expansion of South Texas College of Law, including the construction of what was then conceived of as a five-story building on the college parking lot. South Texas also bought 80 percent of the block east of the school, on Caroline Street, which would become the faculty and staff parking lot.

May 13. Richard P. Hogan (1961) gave the commencement speech at Temple Emanu-El.

Fall. Law firm recruiting and interviewing at South Texas College of Law increased by over 15 percent from the previous year. This increase was attributed, in part, to an increased focus on placement and the success of the advocacy program.

October. Hon. Robert Casey (1940) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. John K. Grubb (1972) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 29. At the Founders' Day luncheon, Dean Garland Walker gave a status report on the planning of the school's new facility, which would now be eight stories tall (and later increase to eleven stories) and adjoin the school's current building. The new building would be known as the "Tower," and its construction was planned for the spring of 1982.

^Top^

1982- Groundbreaking

South Texas had a full-time faculty of 24.

Adjunct Professor Marshall Taheri (1973) was appointed chair of the ad hoc committee on the Immigration Task Force of the International Business Committee of the Houston Chamber of Commerce.

The Continuing Legal Education (CLE) Department was created. The CLE Department currently sponsors or cosponsors 15-20 programs, and hosts another 200 programs, per year. Since 1986, the department has sponsored over 200 programs in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, and Ohio, attended by more than 30,000 attorneys, judges, and other professionals.

Spring. The Law Student Division of the ABA chose South Texas to host the 14th annual Regional Client Counseling Competition in 1983.

April 19. The John H. Wood Inn of Phi Delta Phi was established at South Texas to promote intellectual, social, and professional values among law students.

May 12. Dr. Margaret Bearn, associate dean of New York Law School, gave the commencement address at Temple Emanu-El.

June 29. Dean Garland R. Walker was elected a life fellow of the Texas Bar Association.

July. South Texas won the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition in Austin. The winning team consisted of Devon H. Decker (1983), Jeff E. Rusk (1983), Neil C. McCabe (1982), and Robert H. Smith (1983).

October. Mayo J. Thompson (1949) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Marshall Taheri (1973) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 8. Ground was broken for the 11-story Tower building at South Texas. Houston Endowment Inc. was one of the generous supporters of this project. At the ceremonies held at the Joe M. Green, Jr., Advocacy Center, Al Parker of the Board of Trustees gave the welcoming address and Joe R. Greenhill, chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court, gave the keynote address.

October 21-23. The South Texas moot court team, coached by Dean T. Gerald Treece, won the national championship at the John Marshall/Benton-Westinghouse Foundation National Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago. In addition to the national title, South Texas won awards for best written brief and top advocate. The topic of the brief was "Constitutional Limitations on Cable TV." The team consisted of M. Karen Debiasse (1983), Daniel W. Leedy (1983), Janet L. Ross (1983), and Robert H. Smith (1983).

November 5. Professor Charles Weigel and his legal medicine students were among the guest speakers at a continuing legal education seminar held at the Medical Center Holiday Inn for the Patient Education Exchange Group.

^Top^

1983 -- Judge Bell Celebrates 50th Anniversary

Dean Garland R. Walker was accepted into the Fellows of the American Bar Association as a life member.

February 22-24. South Texas's moot court team won the national championship at the J. Braxton Craven National Invitational Moot Court Tournament in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The winning team consisted of Devon H. Decker (1983), Kerry C. Hagan (1984), Harry Keith Lynch (1985), and Virginia Paige Pace (1984).

Spring. The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) was formed.

April 15. At the Student Awards Banquet, the college gave a 50-year recognition award to Hon. Spurgeon Bell for his service to South Texas.

May 11. Judge Paul Pressler, associate justice of the 14th Court of Appeals, gave the commencement address at Temple Emanu-El.

Summer. Dr. Peter Riga taught a new seminar course on Bioethics and the Law. This was the first time any law school in Houston had offered a course on this topic.

Summer. Dean Treece became the legal correspondent for KHOU-TV, Channel 11. He began appearing on the station whenever a major legal question arose. Dean Treece continues to serve as legal correspondent for the station today, answering legal questions on Wednesday and Saturday mornings.

June. A South Texas moot court team captured the state moot court championship at the state bar convention in Fort Worth. South Texas also won for the best brief. The winning team consisted of Devon H. Decker (1983), Virginia Paige Pace (1984), and Jeff E. Rusk (1983).

August. The South Texas moot court team won the national championship at the ABA Appellate Advocacy Competition, held at the ABA convention in Atlanta. The winning team consisted of Devon H. Decker (1983), H. Kip Morgan (1985), and Jeff E. Rusk (1983).

September 14. The Federal Civil Practice Institute was held at South Texas College of Law. Charles Alan Wright of the University of Texas and Arthur Miller of Harvard, authors of Federal Practice and Procedure, spoke at the institute.

October. Durell M. Carothers (1934) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Elaine A. Carlson (1979) became president of the Alumni Association.

November 10. Texas Supreme Court Justice Franklin Spear spoke at the college; the event was hosted by the Sam Houston Chapter of Phi Alpha Delta.

December 3. The First and Fourteenth Courts of Appeals moved into the Tower. South Texas became, and remains, the only law school in the United States to permanently house two appellate courts.

^Top^

1984 -- The Jesse H. Jones Legal Center Opens

South Texas had 34 full-time faculty members and over 1,200 students.

The college received as a gift from John Carter, of the Carter Galleries in Austin, an original oil portrait of Abraham Lincoln and his son, Tad. The portrait, painted by Franklin C. Courter from a Mathew Brady photograph of the president, now hangs in Garrett-Townes Hall.

The International Law Society was formed at South Texas.

The Law Review initiated the "Write-on Program" to give highly motivated students with superior writing skills but with a GPA below 80 an alternate way to work on the publication.

The Hispanic Law Students Association (HLSA) was formed to assist in the educational needs and professional goals of Hispanic law students.

South Texas won the national championship at the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, held in Washington, D.C. The winning team consisted of Christopher DiFerrante (1985), David W. Holman (1985), M. Kip Morgan (1985), Katrina B. Packard, and David J. Sacks (1985).

South Texas won the national championship at the Frederick Douglass BALSA Moot Court Competition in St. Louis, Missouri. The winning team consisted of Valda J. Combs-Jordan (1985) and Genora A. Kendrick (1985).

February. South Texas College of Law graduate Olan Boudreaux (1984) earned the highest score on the February state bar exam.

Spring. Elaine Carlson (1979), president of the Alumni Association, said that the association would focus on three areas: (1) scholarship funding; (2) publishing an alumni directory; and (3) encouraging the growth of alumni chapters.

Spring. As part of the library's expansion, South Texas created a U.S. Documents Room, which was housed on the first floor of Cullen building.

Spring. The Lindsay Haid Award was offered for the first time to honor this South Texas student who died of breast cancer in 1982 after having just completed law school. Lindsay Haid epitomized school spirit at South Texas, and the award recognizes a student for outstanding involvement in the school. Mary Margaret Hamilton (1984) was the first recipient of the award.

March 3. South Texas won the national championship at the J. Braxton Craven National Invitational Moot Court Competition in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The winning team consisted of Richard P. Hogan, Jr. (1985), Kay E. Johnson (1985), Vickie L. Martin (1984), Deborah A. Petryszak-Stephenson (1985), and Diana K. Shaw (1984).

March 30. South Texas won first place and the best-brief award at the F. Lee Bailey Moot Court Competition, sponsored by the National University in San Diego, California. The winning team consisted of Janet E. Dillard (1985), Alan D. Goldstein (1985), Randy R. Howry (1985), Michael B. Martin (1985), Sandra McKenzie (1985), and Shane Sanders (1985).

April 14. The theme of the Spring Banquet at the Shamrock Hilton was a special salute to Dean Walker and Addie Heaton, administrative assistant to the dean, for their respective 25 years of service to the college. The "Lady Lawyer" ballad was sung at the event.

May. The Health Law Program, jointly conducted by South Texas and Trinity University of San Antonio, debuted. Dr. Edward Richards III, South Texas professor, was director of the program.

May 2. The new 11-story Tower building was opened, and the entire law school complex was dedicated as the Jesse H. Jones Legal Center. The Tower's opening increased the school's physical plant by more than 130 percent. The South Texas complex became regarded as one of the most modern and attractive law school buildings in the country. The dedication was a historic event for South Texas College of Law and for the city of Houston. The featured guest was Hon. William H. Rehnquist, then an associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Hon. Jack Pope, chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court, gave the keynote address.

May 2-4. The second Federal Civil Practice Institute was held, with Justice William H. Rehnquist as featured speaker. It was directed by Cari Matthews, associate professor at South Texas College of Law.

May 9. James B. Sales, attorney-at-law with Fulbright & Jaworski, gave the commencement address at Temple Emanu-El.

May 22. John Henry Faulk, a well-known Texas author once blacklisted during the McCarthy era, spoke at the college on his fight to protect First Amendment speech during this era.

Summer. Associate Dean Wayne Thomas (1968) said that for security reasons the Polk Street exit would be permanently closed and used as a fire exit only. The only entrance to the college would be through the main entrance on San Jacinto Street.

July. South Texas College of Law sponsored a Family Law Seminar under the direction of Professor Susan Crump.

July 2-5. South Texas won the state championship at the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition in San Antonio, and also won for best brief. The winning team consisted of Richard P. Hogan, Jr. (1985), Vickie L. Martin (1984), and Virginia Paige Pace (1984).

Fall. Dean Treece was asked by James Baker III, President Ronald Reagan's chief of staff, to critique Reagan's performance against Walter Mondale in the first presidential debate.

Fall. The South Texas Law Journal began the year with a new adviser (Professor Robert Marsel), a new look, and a new approach, in an effort to improve the publication.

October. John Turner (1970) became president of the Alumni Association.

October. The Alumni Association established the Garland R. Walker Memorial Scholarship Fund through an initial gift of $10,000 from one alumnus. The fund was increased to $50,000 through donations solicited from charter members by Alumni Association President John Turner (1970). It is now in excess of $450,000 and provides annual scholarships to students based on merit and need.

October. Hon. Phillip B. Baldwin (1951) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October 2. Richard "Racehorse" Haynes, senior partner at Haynes & Fullenwielder, spoke in Garrett-Townes Hall on "The Nature of an Attorney."

October 4. Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spoke to three hundred students at South Texas on the current state of public-interest law.

October 26. Garland R. Walker resigned as dean because of ill health, but remained as president at the request of the school's trustees. He had been employed by the college for 25 years. The Walker administration focused on improving the college, especially its physical plant. Professor William J. Williamson became interim dean of South Texas, where he had taught in some capacity for more than 20 years. He was an adjunct faculty member from 1941 to 1957 and became a full-time faculty member in 1977.

November 1. Dean William J. Williamson was installed as president of the college, in addition to serving as interim dean. Among the issues Dean Williamson prioritized at the beginning of his tenure was improving how the college handled financial aid.

November 3. The South Texas SBA and the Board of Advocates were presented with the Outstanding Student Bar Association Award during the national ABA convention.

December 2. Dean Garland R. Walker died at age 64. He was buried next to his father's grave in Billington, Texas, near Waco.

^Top^

1985 -- The Advocacy Program Earns Special Recognition

January 21. A memorial service for Dean Garland R. Walker was held at South Texas.

Spring. Eight students from South Texas helped the poor and elderly prepare their income tax returns as members of the Volunteer Tax Assistance Program (VTA). This was the first year South Texas students participated in VTA, and the program continues today.

Spring. Enrollment increased by 75 students over 1984. The largest increases were in the categories of ethnic minorities (up 57 percent over Spring 1984 enrollment) and women (up 4 percent). In the Spring 1985 semester, women represented 40 percent of the school's total enrollment.

April 9. Judge John R. Brown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit was the guest of honor at a reception honoring South Texas Law Journal students.

May 15. Texas Supreme Court Justice John L. Hill was the commencement speaker at graduation, held at Temple Emanu-El.

May 17. The Texas Senate passed a resolution that formally recognized the South Texas advocacy program. From 1980 to 1985, South Texas had won 20 regional and national advocacy championships.

May 20. Gloria Steinem, Ms. Magazine publisher and feminist, addressed a standing-room-only crowd at South Texas on the topic of pornography and the First Amendment.

June. South Texas College of Law won the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition for the third consecutive year, entitling South Texas to retire the cup. South Texas was the only school to ever accomplish this feat since the competition had begun in 1939. The winning team consisted of Terrie S. Gerlich (now Sechrist) (1986), Richard P. Hogan, Jr. (1985), and Michael B. Martin (1985).

Summer. The Hispanic Law Students Society (HLSA) was formed at South Texas. Its objectives were to promote academic excellence among its members, enhance career opportunities for its members, and serve the college and the legal community.

August 13. The South Texas Law Journal changed its name to the South Texas Law Review. This move was authorized by the Board of Directors of the journal at their annual meeting. The new name reflected a more scholarly image, which would be more accepted by the legal community and advantageous to the review's members. At the time there were 185 law reviews, but only 47 law journals. With few exceptions, law journals cover just one subject per edition. Because the South Texas publication covered more than one subject area, the title South Texas Law Review was considered more appropriate.

October. Hon. Foster T. Bean (1928) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Iris Hefter Robinson (1967) became president of the Alumni Association.

October. South Texas won the national championship at the Benton-Westinghouse National Moot Court Competition, held at John Marshall School of Law in Chicago. The winning team consisted of Carmody C. Baker (1986), Vincent Lannie (1986), Rodney Paasch (1986), and Andrew B. Sommerman (1986).

October. South Texas became the first law school in Texas to join the American Law Network, sponsored by the American Law Institute-American Bar Association.

November 21. Texas Supreme Court Justice Raul A. Gonzalez spoke at a reception sponsored by the Hispanic Law Students Association and the SBA on "The Inner Workings of the Texas Supreme Court."

November 23. South Texas won the first-ever ABA National Negotiation and Settlement Competition regionals, held at the college.

December 15. James W. McCartney, a partner at Vinson & Elkins, spoke at commencement, which was held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Advocacy Center.

^Top^

1986-- The Pennzoil Case Comes to South Texas

During the 1986-87 academic year, eight of the eighteen students selected as Texas Supreme Court clerks for the 1986-87 term were from South Texas.

The South Texas Legal Institute for Medical Studies was established.

January. The Southwestern Legal Foundation created its newest division, the Institute for Transnational Arbitration, which would be housed at South Texas. Professor Richard Graving was named the first director of the institute.

January. For the first time, all South Texas classes were held in the new Tower building.

Mid-January. William J. Williamson, who had been interim dean since 1984, was formally named dean of South Texas College of Law. Accepting the appointment for a term of three years, Dean Williamson announced three main goals for his tenure: (1) to provide the highest-quality legal education possible to South Texas students; (2) to give graduating students the proper experience and knowledge with which to pass the bar exam; and (3) to prepare students for a successful future in the legal profession.

February. South Texas won the national championship at the J. Braxton Craven National Invitational Moot Court Competition in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The winning team consisted of Carmody C. Baker (1986), Vincent A. Lannie (1986), Rodney J. Paasch (1986), and Andrew J. Sommerman (1986).

February 8. South Texas won the national championship at the ABA's National Negotiation and Settlement Competition in Baltimore, Maryland. The winning team consisted of J. Ken Johnson (1986) and Lawrence Daniel (1986).

Spring. Internship opportunities were available for the first time with the Texas Accountants and Lawyers for the Performing Arts.

March. South Texas won the national championship at the F. Lee Bailey Moot Court Competition in San Diego, California. The winning team consisted of David Minton (1987), John Ragland (1987), Karen Johnson (1987), and Sharon Eakes (1987).

March 19. The Health Law Organization was established for students interested in expanding their career horizons in the emerging field of health law.

March 20. The Women's Legal Forum presented a program on "Collaborative Reproductive Techniques: The Legal, Medical, and Ethical Implications." The program was believed to be the first presentation in the Houston area to address the topic of infertility and its legal aspects. Among the speakers was John Montgomery, adjunct professor at South Texas.

April. The South Texas SBA sponsored the first annual Law Week. A mayoral proclamation acknowledged this event and recognized South Texas College of Law’s contribution to the legal community and its success in national advocacy competitions.

May 1. Houston Endowment Inc. established the Bob Casey Scholarship.

May 10. Hon. Frank G. Evans, chief justice of the First Court of Appeals, gave the commencement address at South Texas's graduation ceremonies, held at Jesse H. Jones Hall.

May 12. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Byron White met with members of the South Texas Law Review at a cocktail reception hosted by Fifth Circuit Judge John R. Brown at his River Oaks home.

Summer. Bobby Grisby opened Grisby's cafeteria at South Texas.

Summer. An edition of the South Texas Law Review (27:3) was devoted to constitutional law issues, and included contributions from distinguished legal scholars such as U.S. Supreme Court justices William J. Brennan, Jr., and John Paul Stevens, former U.S. Supreme Court justice Arthur Goldberg, and U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese.

July. The Pennzoil v. Texaco case was heard by the First Court of Appeals in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Advocacy Center at South Texas. It was the largest civil damages case in U.S. history. South Texas trustees Joseph Jamail, of Jamail & Kolius, and James B. Sales, of Fulbright & Jaworski, served as counsel for the opposing sides.

Fall. Forty-two percent of the student body was female and more than 9 percent were members of ethnic minority groups (up 6 percent over the previous five years). Also in 1986, there were 44 full-time faculty members at South Texas.

Fall. The Houston law firm of Vinson & Elkins pledged $15,000 in scholarships to recognize, encourage, and support academic excellence among the students at South Texas College of Law.

Fall. "No Name Law School" T-shirts were sold at South Texas in response to a Wall Street Journal article referring to the college in those terms.

Fall. Addie Heaton, administrative assistant (emeritus) to the dean, became archivist.

Fall. The Black Law Students Association and Hispanic Law Students Association formed a joint committee to study minority policies and their effectiveness at South Texas.

September 25. The Garland R. Walker Memorial Plaque was unveiled at the South Texas Alumni Association Annual Meeting in Garrett-Townes Hall. The plaque featured the bronzed names of the 446 charter donors to the Garland R. Walker Memorial Scholarship Fund.

October. Fred A. Lange (1929), author of a three-volume set on Texas land titles, received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Ronald B. Wardell, Jr. (1979), became president of the Alumni Association.

October 26-29. South Texas College of Law won the Benton-Westinghouse National Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. The winning team, which argued a fact situation on defamation law and its First Amendment considerations, consisted of Carmody C. Baker (1986), Vincent Lannie (1986), Rodney Paasch (1986), and Andrew B. Sommerman (1986).

November. South Texas won first place at the Thelen, Marrin, Johnson, & Bridges Mock Trial Competition, held in Houston. The team consisted of Douglas Dougherty (1987), Michael F. Hancock (1987), and Patrick L. Hancock (1987). This was the first time a South Texas team had won this competition.

December. Hon. Lamar McCorkle (1980), judge of the 133rd Civil District Court, was the speaker at commencement, held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Advocacy Center.

^Top^

1987 -- The Institute of Transnational Arbitration Comes to South Texas

February 28. A mock trial skills seminar sponsored by the Board of Advocates was aimed at introducing students to the basic methods of conducting a mock trial and allowing them to practice these methods.

March 9-14. The second annual Law Week at South Texas featured mock trial competitions; campus visits by noted attorneys, including Richard "Racehorse" Haynes, and jurists; a discussion of handwriting analysis; and seminars to help students learn to form an "image for success."

Late March. The Black Law Students Association National Convention was held at South Texas and co-hosted by the South Texas chapter of the association.

April. The Board of Trustees selected Touche Ross & Co. to conduct a management study that would examine all aspects of the college's administrative and academic organization. This was the first such study conducted at South Texas since its separation from the YMCA.

April. The Institute of Transnational Arbitration, operated by the Southwestern Legal Foundation, moved to South Texas. The institute's purpose in general was to encourage the resolution of transnational investment disputes, and in particular was to promote acceptance of international arbitration treaties. The institute was housed on the fourth floor of the college.

June. South Texas board member James B. Sales was elected president of the State Bar of Texas; his term ran from 1988 to 1989.

June. South Texas won the state championship at the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition, held in Corpus Christi. The team consisted of Richard N. Laminack (1987), Katherine A. Martinez (1987), and Trace J. Sherer (1988).

July 31. Frances Thompson retired after serving as director of the South Texas College of Law Library for 22 years.

October. Joseph M. Guarino (1949) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Olan J. Boudreaux (1984) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 5. Delta Theta Phi sponsored an AIDS-testing symposium.

October 19. South Texas implemented an administrative reorganization and expansion after receiving the results of the management study conducted by Touche Ross & Co. for the Board of Trustees. The changes were made because the Board of Trustees believed that the college had outgrown the existing structure of its staff and administration. As a result of the study, a new business officer was hired to report to the president, Financial Aid became a part of Institutional Advancement, and Public Affairs (External CLE Programs) was transferred from Institutional Advancement to the Continuing Legal Education Department. The bookstore, which had been managed by one library staff employee, was contracted to Barnes & Noble.

November. An SBA survey indicated that lockers, no-smoking areas, and quieter study facilities were some of the important issues to South Texas College of Law students.

November 6. South Texas advocates won first place at the Starr Insurance Law Moot Court Competition, sponsored by the Hartford Insurance Company and conducted at the University of Connecticut Law School in Hartford. The winning team consisted of Jeffrey A. Addicks (1988), Robert W. Musemeche (1988), Wade R. Quinn (1988), and Sharon M. Schweitzer (1989).

^Top^

1988 -- A. A. White Dispute Resolution Institute Opens

The A. A. White Dispute Resolution Institute was established by Judge Frank Evans to foster public awareness and understanding of conflict resolution, encourage the development and use of alternative means of dispute resolution, assist the courts in encouraging the early settlement of pending litigation, and help institutions in the development and use of alternative dispute resolution and conflict management procedures.

In 1988, South Texas teams finished first in nine out of thirteen mock trial and moot court tournaments that they participated in.

March. South Texas won first place and the award for best brief at the National Administrative Law Moot Court Competition in Dayton, Ohio. The competition was judged in the final round by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. The first-place team consisted of Jeffrey A. Addicks (1988), Jon L. Christensen (1989), Glenn E. Huebner (1988), Scott C. Lannie (1988), and Sharon M. Schweitzer (1989). Another South Texas team won third place in the competition.

March 16. South Texas hosted a debate between Phyllis Schlafly, attorney and anti-ERA advocate, and Sarah Weddington, Roe v. Wade attorney, at the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium. The topic of the debate was "Legal Rights of Privacy"; it was moderated by Federal District Judge Lynn Hughes, who was also an adjunct professor at South Texas. The debate was later televised on "Access Houston."

March 19-20. South Texas won first place at the F. Lee Bailey National Moot Court Competition in San Diego, California, and was awarded second place for its written brief. The South Texas team consisted of Meredith Christensen, Sharon M. Schweitzer (1989), Nicholas J. Lanza (1989), and Howard H. Singleton (1989).

May 8. Judge Bert H. Tunks died. He had been a South Texas College of Law trustee and retired trial and appellate judge, and taught Corporate Law at South Texas for 15 years.

May 12-13. Joe Jamail, Gerry Spence, Richard "Racehorse" Haynes, and Justice William Kilgarlin spoke at the "Seminar of the Century" at South Texas. "Trial Tactics and Techniques for Winning" was the theme of the Texas Trial Lawyers Association event.

May 14-18. South Texas's Law Week was presented as the college's "homecoming." James B. Sales, president-elect of the State Bar of Texas and senior partner at Fulbright & Jaworski, spoke.

June 5. Jerry Urban's article in the Houston Chronicle entitled "Harvard on the Bayou" led to an extended discussion on how South Texas should improve its image and its standards.

August. Dean Williamson announced that he would not seek another term as dean. Williamson improved South Texas in four major areas -- faculty and staff, the library, building maintenance, and student services. During his term, Admissions, Financial Aid, and Career Development were expanded. He also sought membership for the college in the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), in order to enhance the value of South Texas degrees and to lend to South Texas graduates greater credibility with future employers.

August 7. South Texas won the prestigious ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition, held in conjunction with the ABA annual meeting in Toronto, Canada. The team consisted of Levon Hovnatanian (1988), Robert W. Musemeche (1988) (brief writer), S. Shawn Stephens (1988), and alternates Robert Foran (1988) and Teresa Letson (1989). The team was coached by Professor T. Gerald Treece and Associate Professor Neil McCabe (1982).

September 14. At a trial held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium at South Texas, District Court Judge Woody Denson sentenced Richard Lee Beavers to death by lethal injection. Beavers had been convicted of capital murder on September 9.

October. Elliott A. Johnson (1937) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Olan J. Boudreaux (1984) was reelected president of the Alumni Association.

October. South Texas won the John Marshall-Benton National Moot Court Competition in Chicago. The South Texas team consisted of Robert P. Scamardo (1989), Nicholas Lanza (1989), Steve Couch (1989), and Sharon M. Schweitzer (1989).

November. South Texas won first place at the Starr Insurance Law Moot Court Competition, sponsored by the Hartford Insurance Company and held at the University of Connecticut Law School in Hartford. The first-place team consisted of Lea Ann Glenn (1989), Deanna Smith (1989), Teresa Letson (1989), and Chris Brown (1989).

November 14. The Health Law Society Newsletter was published for the first time.

November 19-20. South Texas won the Thelin, Marrin, Johnson, & Bridges Invitational Mock Trial Competition, held at the Houston Civil Courthouse. Peter Murphy coached the team, which consisted of Alfred C. Koenig (1989), Trace J. Sherer (1988), and Shessy S. Thomas (1988).

^Top^

1989 -- Wilks Becomes Dean of South Texas

The Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA) was formed at South Texas, becoming the first chapter of this organization in Texas.

The Academic Support Program, in which academically at-risk students are tutored by selected second- and third-year students with high GPAs (who are known as Langdell Scholars), began at South Texas.

January 29. In the flag football classic, members of the Law Review defeated the Board of Advocates by a score of 24-6.

Spring. The Hispanic Law Students Association lobbied for the hiring of Hispanic law faculty.

Spring. The faculty began work on a rigorous self-study as part of the application process for membership in the Association of American Law Schools.

March. A South Texas team won the national championship at the ATLA Mock Trial Competition in Chicago. The team consisted of Colleen Barnett (1990), Sharon McCally (1990), Don Washington (1989), and Che Williamson (1989).

April. William L. Wilks became dean. Wilks had formerly been dean at Dickinson School of Law in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, from 1977 through 1987, and had taught at Dickinson from 1970 through 1989. He would work on obtaining AALS membership, obtaining more space and additional improvements for the building, and increasing scholarship funds.

Fall. The computer center opened in the library, thanks to a generous donation by Patrick Mahoney (1988).

Fall. The South Texas Christian Legal Society was recognized by the National Christian Legal Society.

Fall. Enrollment was at a record 1,300 students. At this time, South Texas was the largest law school in Houston and second-largest in Texas. The University of Texas was first, with over 1,500 students.

September 13. The Board of Trustees officially established the college's first endowed professorship and named it for Judge Spurgeon Bell in recognition of his long career at the college. Bell was also named holder of the professorship for the 1989-90 academic year.

October. Hon. Abraham Ramirez Jr. (1965) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Martin L. Mayo (1982) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 25. The Black Law Students Association hosted the candidates' debate for the 18th Congressional District election. State Senator Craig Washington, State Representative Al Edwards, and State Representative Ron Wilson were the participants.

October 25-27. South Texas advocates swept all honors at the Benton-Westinghouse National Moot Court Competition in Chicago. The first-place team consisted of Colleen P. Barnett (1990), Christopher Brown (1990), Lea Ann Glenn (1989), and Robert Pruitt (1990).

October 31. Mayor Kathy Whitmire and ex-mayor Fred Hofheinz, her challenger in the mayoral election, debated in South Texas's Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium. The debate was televised on KTRK-TV, Channel 13, and Dave Ward, a news anchor for the station, served as moderator. Whitmire was president of the National Association of Mayors at the time.

November. South Texas won the Starr Insurance Law Moot Court Competition, held in Hartford, Connecticut. The winning team consisted of Kevin Jackson (1990), Andrea Lopes (1990), Dawn Meade (1990), and Richard Alan Morris (1991).

November 1. The Sports and Entertainment Law Society was created at South Texas. Its purposes were to (1) bring speakers and information on this developing field to South Texas, (2) introduce members to sports and entertainment law attorneys so that they could gain a better understanding of how the field worked, and (3) encourage those who were interested in careers in the field.

November 23. South Texas College of Law Professor Charles (Lew) Blood died. He had taught at South Texas from 1970 through 1988.

^Top^

1990 -- Bell and Rather Receive Honorary Degrees from South Texas

March 25-28. An ABA accreditation team inspected South Texas College of Law. This was the third such ABA reinspection that South Texas had undergone since it received full ABA approval in 1969.

April 6. Lauro Cavazos, U.S. secretary of education, was the featured speaker at Law Day.

May 5. At commencement, Dean William L. Wilks conferred honorary degrees on Judge Spurgeon Bell and CBS news anchor Dan Rather, a former South Texas student. Rather gave the commencement address.

June 18. The Jesse H. Jones scholarship was established by Houston Endowment Inc.

August. South Texas won the ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition in Chicago. The winning team consisted of Christopher Brown (1990), Sharon McCally (1990), Rick Morris (1991), and Deanna Smith (1989).

August 20. The South Texas Disability Clinic, South Texas's first legal clinic, opened its doors at 1602 San Jacinto, formerly a vacant building. Seven student interns began the clinic program, most of whom would work well over the number of hours required to receive credit. Known today as the General Civil Clinic, the facility continues to help those who might otherwise not receive legal counsel and to offer students an opportunity to experience the law firsthand.

September. The Health Law Studies Institute was approved.

October. John W. Turner (1970) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Martin L. Mayo (1982) was reelected president of the Alumni Association.

October 17. Open house was held for the Tower "build-out."

November 11-17. South Texas won the Invitational Tournament of Champions Mock Trial Competition in Akron, Ohio. The winning team consisted of Mark Murray (1990), Charles (Chip) Brennig (1992), Cindy Weaver (1992), and Phil Nizialek (1991).

^Top^

1991 -- Library Begins $1.5 Million Facelift

In Harris County, over one-third of all lawyers (5,000 out of 14,273) were South Texas alumni. In the Houston area, 95 percent of recently retired judges (from the municipal to the state appellate level) were South Texas alumni. From 1981 through 1991, South Texas won thirty-one national moot court championships, five Texas state bar championships, and one international championship.

The Republican Law Students at South Texas was established.

The Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association assisted the Houston branch of the Asian American Bar in establishing a scholarship program at South Texas.

Lex Terra, published by the Environmental Law Society, began publication. It provided a forum for students, faculty, and environmental professionals to discuss environmental issues and debate policy.

Professor Kimberlee Kovach helped develop the Texas State Mediation Championship to improve and promote mediation advocacy skills.

February. South Texas won the award for best brief at the F. Lee Bailey Moot Court Competition, held at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The winning team consisted of Rob Galloway (1991) and Reid Martin (1991).

Spring. South Texas hosted Safety Awareness Week. The college was enhancing its security at the time; in 1991 it spent about $200,000 on security services, including an expanded outside patrol.

Spring. The college announced new scholarship funds: the Baker Endowed Scholarship Fund, the Bob Dunn Endowed Scholarship, and the Claire R. Mudge Scholarship Fund.

March. Students received mailboxes in order to better facilitate communication and improve the way the college informed them about school events.

April 4-10. Law Week celebrated the two hundredth anniversary of the Bill of Rights. Guests included Morris Overstreet of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, Professor Harold Hyman of Rice University, and Sarah Weddington, the plaintiff's attorney in Roe v. Wade.

April 8. Nancy Bunnin (1983), associate director of the Houston ACLU, Professor Harold Hyman of Rice University, and Judge Lupe Salinas addressed the right of Hispanics to have an interpreter. Professor Sandra Grecia of the University of Houston discussed the discriminatory effects of the "drug courier profile."

April 9. The AALS inspected South Texas as part of the school's membership application process.

May. Postscripts, the alumni newsletter, began publication.

May 17. The first annual Alumni Association Luncheon for graduating South Texas students was held at the Inns of Court. The purpose of the luncheon was to introduce new South Texas graduates to the Alumni Association.

May 18. Secretary of State James Baker III spoke at commencement, which was held at Jesse H. Jones Hall. His youngest son, Douglas Baker (1991), was among the year's graduates. Baker advised the South Texas graduates "to look after the little guy who gets stuck with the dead duck."

May 25. The 13th circuit of the ABA/LSD held its summer meeting at South Texas.

June. South Texas won first place at the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition, held in Houston. The team consisted of Sean E. Breen (1992), Robert Galloway (1991), and Shelley D. Van Natter (1993).

June 19-22. Charles (Bob) Dunn (1965) was elected president of the Texas State Bar. On June 20, South Texas held a reception in Dunn's honor.

Summer. Bobby Grisby moved into his newly expanded food-service area.

Summer. Chris Bell (1992), SBA senior senator and future Houston city councilman, led the effort to close the Tip Top Lounge, located behind South Texas at Clay and Caroline, because it was seen as a public nuisance.

Summer. The South Texas Board of Trustees gave its approval to a capital campaign to build a new library facility. As part of a $1.5 million facelift for the college, the library underwent an extensive renovation, expanding by 12,000 square feet within the Cullen Building. This expansion was needed to provide more room for both research and study. The library staff moved more than 40,000 books to new locations following the renovation.

August. South Texas had the largest entering class in its history. Total enrollment stood at 1,400, a new record.

August. South Texas won the 1991 ABA National Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Competition, held in Atlanta. The winning team consisted of Kraft Greg Eidman (1991), John H. Kim (1992), and Shelly D. Van Natter (1993). The problem presented to the team involved an issue of clergy malpractice and the ability of a trial court to enjoin the publication of matters contained in a lawsuit.

Fall. Judge Spurgeon Bell, the "professor of procedure," announced his retirement from teaching.

Fall. Women accounted for 41.3 percent of all students enrolled at South Texas.

Fall. South Texas began participation in the Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) program. CLEO helps economically and educationally disadvantaged students, many of whom are ethnic minorities, get a head start on their legal education. Eight students participated in CLEO during the first semester of the program's existence.

Fall. Major course requirement changes were implemented for first-year students. Constitutional Law was added to the first-year curriculum, and Agency and Partnership was dropped as a required course.

Fall. The college introduced the Kenneth Fountain Scholarship in honor of the 1966 South Texas graduate.

Fall. Student organizations moved into their new offices on the second floor of the Cullen Building.

Fall. The first phonathon was held at South Texas. It ran for ten days and generated pledges of over $82,000, nearly doubling the college's goal of $45,000.

Fall. Vinson & Elkins made a $200,000 challenge grant to help South Texas reach its annual fund goal of $360,000.

Fall. The firm of Fisher, Gallagher, & Lewis pledged $100,000 as a challenge grant to South Texas alumni.

September. To support its expansion, the Disability Clinic received $154,000 via two sources: IOLTA funds, distributed by the Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation, and grants from the U.S. Department of Education.

September. South Texas sponsored a debate between Professor Neil McCabe (1982) and Vinson & Elkins attorney Clark Ervin over the qualifications of Judge Clarence Thomas to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. The debate, entitled "The Thomas Nomination: Quota or Qualified," was held before a large audience in Garrett-Townes Hall.

September 27. The first A&M Aggie scholarship was established by Texas A&M University and South Texas alumnus Patrick Mahoney (1988).

October. Richard P. Hogan (1961) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Robert K. Schaffer (1984) became president of the Alumni Association.

October. South Texas won first place at the National Criminal Procedure Moot Court Competition in San Diego, California. The team consisted of Annmarie Washington (1992) and Michael D. Hudgins (1993).

October 28. South Texas hosted the Houston mayoral debate, which was broadcast live by KTRK-TV, Channel 13. The candidates were Mayor Kathy Whitmire, developer Bob Lanier, and State Representative Sylvester Turner. Lanier, a 1950-51 South Texas faculty member, would be elected mayor.

October 30. The South Texas Chapter of Republican Lawyers was formed.

October 31. Grover Rees, one of the original faculty members of the college, celebrated his 100th birthday and his 75th anniversary as a member of the State Bar of Texas.

November 5-7. Hon. Myron H. Bright, judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit, and Hon. Gerald B. Tjoflat, chief judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, participated in the first ABA "Jurists in Residence" program to be held at South Texas. Under the program, the judges served as guest lecturers in some classes and discussed legal issues with students.

November 8. At the Phi Delta Phi initiation, Nick C. Nichols, a former South Texas professor, was awarded honorary membership for his continuing contributions to the school. Nichols, a name partner in the Houston law firm of Abraham, Watkins, Nichols, & Friend, taught Civil Trial Advocacy at South Texas and was named the outstanding adjunct professor of the year in 1987.

December 15. On the two hundredth anniversary of the Bill of Rights, 52 students from Jefferson Davis High School and Duchesne Academy, under the guidance of their government teachers, worked with South Texas on a Bill of Rights pamphlet dealing with issues such as abortion, school prayer, school news regulation, school desegregation, the drinking age, and other juvenile-law topics.

December 17. U.S. Senator Lloyd Bentsen was the commencement speaker at South Texas's graduation, held at Jones Hall. In asking the graduating class to use their legal education to improve the country, Bentsen, who received an honorary degree from South Texas, urged the graduates to "take the risks, make the commitment, accept the sacrifice."

December 31. Professor Bob Hogan retired.

^Top^

1992 -- Library and Student Center Dedication

Professor Bruce Burton and Associate Dean Sandra DeGraw traveled to Prague to teach "American Legal Systems" to government ministers of the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic.

South Texas Democrats was formed.

The college benefited from the creation of the following new endowments: Fred Parks (1937) gave $100,000 to the law school's unrestricted endowment, and a second $100,000 to establish the Fred Parks Advocacy Professorship; in memory of Hyman Slohm (1935), Emilie Slohm established an endowed scholarship with a gift of $150,000; and Mike Gross designated that $350,000 be given to South Texas in trust upon his death to provide scholarships for disadvantaged minority students.

January. Edgar Smith, Houston businessman, was elected chairman of the Board of Trustees. This was the first time in South Texas history that a nonlawyer had been elected chairman. Smith owned the Alamo Barge Company and held a 27 percent interest in the Dallas Cowboys.

January. South Texas published the first issue of Currents International Trade Journal; its circulation was 5,100.

January 9. The Library and Student Center were dedicated after extensive renovation.

February. South Texas "adopted" Travis Elementary School. The arrangement involved a partnership with the students and faculty of Travis Elementary through a community outreach program called "Community Partnership," which provided underprivileged children an opportunity to interact with law students and South Texas a means of sharing with the community. Students, faculty, and staff from South Texas volunteered to tutor and read to students.

February 3. Judge Stephen M. Schwebel of the International Court of Justice visited South Texas to discuss "The Performance and Prospects of the World Court," and careers in international law. South Texas was the first law school in Texas to host Judge Schwebel, who spoke in Garrett-Townes Hall.

February 6. The U.S. Marine Corps conducted a mock court martial in Garrett-Townes Hall. Marine judge advocates from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, reenacted the U.S. v. Morris case, which involved the possession and sale of illegal drugs.

February 19-22. South Texas won the J. Braxton Craven National Moot Court Invitational at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill for the third time. The winning team consisted of Sean Breen (1992) (also named top advocate), Troy Williams (1993), Craig Haston (1992), and Debra Donaldson (1993).

Spring. For the first time in its history, South Texas made an effort to reduce rather than increase its enrollment. The college accepted 120 new students, as opposed to the previously planned 150 new students. South Texas doubled the percentage of minority students enrolled between 1983 (6 percent) and 1992 (12 percent).

March. After two months, the case of Grace Wessel et al. v. Dow Chemical Co., a major product liability case held at South Texas, ended with a victory for the defendant. The case was heard in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

March. Sam Nuchia (1983) became Houston police chief.

March. Forty-five students from Booker T. Washington High School visited South Texas for a mock trial and lunch. In preparing for the case that they tried in Garrett-Townes Hall, the students had used mock trial materials developed and sent to them by the Black Law Students Association.

March. South Texas won the Vanderbilt National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition in Nashville, Tennessee. The team consisted of Mary Riley (1993), Timothy Pridmore (1993), Theresa Lynn (1993), Blanche V. Stovall (1993), William Helixon (1993), and B. Allen Brady (1992).

March 3-7. The SBA issued a call for outlines; those received were kept on file at Kinko's.

March 12-14. South Texas won first and third place in the first ABA National ADR Competition, which was held on campus. The winning team consisted of Edith Premazon (1992) and Betty Johnson Homminga (1992).

March 16. The International Law Society sponsored a visit by Professor Christopher Osakwe, who spoke in the atrium. Osakwe was one of the world's leading non-Russian experts on the laws of the Soviet Union.

April 6-11. State Bar President Charles (Bob) Dunn (1965) discussed "Facts about Our Bodies, Our Health, and Health Care" during Law Week, whose theme was "Health and the Law." The keynote speaker for Law Week was Kay C. James, assistant director of the Bureau of State and Local Affairs, Office of National Drug Control Policy. Her speech was entitled "What We Together Do: Illegal Drug Use, Health, and the Law."

Other Law Week speakers included Dr. Simon Fredricks, professor at Baylor Medical School and the University of Texas Medical Branch, who spoke on "The Current Science of Breast Implants," and a three-member panel of the Electromagnetic Health Effectiveness Committee of the Texas Public Utilities Commission, who discussed "Electromagnetic Energy and Health."

May 12. Former governor John Connally gave the commencement address at South Texas's graduation, held at Jones Hall. Two hundred seventy-three students received their diplomas during the ceremony. Governor Connally said that the prestige of the legal profession was at its lowest ebb in history. Connally called for the abolition of grand juries and plea bargaining.

May 14-16. During Florida Alumni Weekend, the E. J. Salcines Student Lounge was dedicated in a ribbon-cutting ceremony in honor of the 1963 South Texas graduate and Florida judge.

June. The Part-time Students Association (PTSA), now known as the Second-Career Students Association, was established, with Professor Cathy Burnett as its faculty sponsor. PTSA's "Connections" program had two goals: to facilitate part-time student participation in existing South Texas organizations and activities, and to provide a support network of accomplished graduates to help current students.

August. In conjunction with the Republican National Convention in Houston, South Texas hosted a reception for the GOP Platform Committee, an issue forum on the environment, and a forum sponsored by the Creative Coalition, an anticensorship group.

August. South Texas won the ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition, held in San Francisco, California. The winning team consisted of Sean Breen (1992), Shelly D. Van Natter (1993), and Jerry Young (1992).

August 22. Professor Mark Edwin Andrews (1934) died. He had taught at South Texas from 1934 through 1942.

Fall. The Women Law Students Mentor Program was founded at the home of Judge Carolyn Clause-Garcia (1977) in River Oaks.

Fall. Enrollment of minority students at South Texas increased to 15 percent of the student body. At the time, South Texas was the ninth-largest law school in the country, with an enrollment of 1,378.

Fall. At Founders' Day, the law firm of Fisher, Gallagher, & Lewis made a donation of $100,000 to the annual fund.

September 2. Addressing the members of the Board of Advocates, Criminal District Court Judge Ted Poe discussed his creative sentencing techniques, which earned him appearances on the "Geraldo" and "20/20" television shows.

October. Lynne Liberato (1981) received the Distinguished Alumna Award.

October. Robert K. Schaffer (1984) was reelected as president of the Alumni Association.

October. South Texas became involved in the Central and Eastern European Law Initiative (CEELI), a project developed by the ABA Section of International Law and Practice. South Texas students assisted lawyers in the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic by researching issues of importance to this emerging democracy. South Texas had a sister-school relationship with Charles University in Prague. Professor William Wharton was the project's faculty adviser.

October. South Texas won the 11th annual John Marshall Information and Privacy Law Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago. The winning team consisted of Debra E. Donaldson (1993), Michael D. Hudgins (1993), Troy Williams (1993), and David V. Wilson III (1993). The team also won the award for best petitioner's brief.

October 24. South Texas hosted an international symposium, sponsored by the International Law Students Association (ILSA), Currents, and the International Law Society. South Texas was also the site of regional meetings and symposia conducted by ILSA. The group discussed such topics as NAFTA, career opportunities, international arbitration, and international taxation.

October 28. The Aggie Law Students challenged the Texas Exes to a "Bloodletting Contest" during the Health Law Society's blood drive in the atrium. The loser was required to sing the fight song of the winner's alma mater.

October 29-31. South Texas won the John Marshall Privacy Law Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago. The team consisted of Michael D. Hudgins (1993), Troy Williams (1993), David V. Wilson III (1993), and Debra E. Donaldson (1993).

November. Molly Smith, wife of Board of Trustees Chairman Ed Smith, donated a statue and a painting to South Texas. The artwork was displayed in the refurbished student conference room, named in her honor.

November. South Texas won the Starr Insurance Law Moot Court Competition in Hartford, Connecticut. The winning team consisted of Jeff Putnam (1993), Allison Spruill (1993), and Mark White (1993).

December 15. Hon. Edith H. Jones, an associate justice of the Fifth Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals, was the commencement speaker at Jones Hall.

^Top^

1993 -- Law College of the Future

The Texas College of Trial Advocacy (TCTA) ended after 16 years of existence. The TCTA provided an intensive course, which brought together some of the greatest trial lawyers in Texas to tutor others on the art of trial advocacy.

Hays, McConn, Rice, and Pickering created an endowment of $25,000 for South Texas's moot court efforts. The endowment was offered to support the team preparing for the annual Starr Insurance Law Moot Court Competition.

January 15. Elliott Johnson (1937), a long-time member and former chair of the Board of Trustees, died. He had served on the board since 1951.

January 23. Professor Robert Hogan, who had taught at South Texas for two decades, died.

January 24. Six South Texas students participated in the 1993 Tenneco Marathon.

February. A South Texas team won first place at the ABA National Negotiation Tournament, held in Boston. The winning team consisted of Joel Ephross (1993), Melanie Shelnutt (1994), and Brett Shine (1993).

February 1. The John O'Quinn Classroom was dedicated in recognition of the generous contribution that O'Quinn had made to the college's advocacy program.

February 18. The Environmental Law Society sponsored its first Environmental Crimes CLE seminar, which was held in Garrett-Townes Hall. Eva From, of Fulbright & Jaworski; Ron Woods, U.S. attorney for the South District of Texas; Carol Dinkins, of Vinson & Elkins; and Judson Storr, of Venable, Beatgler, Howard, and Curthleth, Washington, D.C., were featured, and South Texas Professor Dianne Barber was moderator.

Spring. A new "Smoker's Pavilion" was built on the Garland Walker Terrace to accommodate smokers, as a result of a new, more restrictive smoking policy.

Spring. South Texas took legal ownership of the property directly across from the law school, on Caroline Street. The property is now used for faculty and staff parking.

Spring. South Texas students began to provide research support for the ABA's liaison in the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic, as part of the Central and East European Law Initiative (CEELI).

Spring. At the college's Spring Banquet, the 20th Anniversary Faculty Award was presented to the late professor Robert J. Hogan's wife, Mary, and their daughters in his memory. Also at the banquet, the Women's Law Forum was recognized as the outstanding student organization of the year.

Spring. The Health Law Forum was published for the first time.

Spring. The Civil Liberties Association was formed at South Texas in the belief that the defense of civil liberties is vital to preserving freedom.

Spring. Professor Kimberlee Kovach agreed to sponsor a student organization at South Texas dedicated to the interests of students in mediation and other forms of alternative dispute resolution.

April 2-3. A South Texas team won the Texas State Mediation Championship, held at the school. Members of the winning team were Shannon Fitzpatrick (1994) and Elyssa Schnurr (1994).

April 16. The U.S. Senate debate, featuring candidates Joe Barton, Jack Fields, Richard Fisher, Joe Gutierrez, Kay Bailey Hutchinson, and Bob Krueger, was held at South Texas in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium. The debate was televised on KHOU-TV, Channel 11.

May 9. Dr. William Cunningham, chancellor of the University of Texas system, gave the South Texas commencement address at Jones Hall.

June-August. Local high school students participated in the third annual Communities in Schools Houston (CISH) Summer Legal Internship Program orientation at South Texas. This was part of a national program designed to motivate students from "at-risk" local high schools to stay in school and learn about career choices many of them might not otherwise consider.

June 12. A six-member legislative-study delegation from the Bureau of Legislative Affairs of the State Council of the People's Republic of China visited South Texas. The delegation, which met with the college's faculty, staff, and students, was charged with drafting a commercial code to nationally regulate the use of banks, bank notes, and checks in China. South Texas was the only law school in Texas to host the delegation.

June 16. At a black-tie reception, the Texas Bar Foundation recognized the South Texas Law Review for publishing the outstanding law review article for 1993.

July 9. The Elliott Johnson Classroom was dedicated in honor of the 1937 South Texas graduate who went on to serve as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

August. South Texas won the ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition in New York, which was held in conjunction with the ABA annual convention. The winning team consisted of Mary Olga Ferguson (1993), Timothy T. Pridmore (1993), and David V. Wilson II (1993). The team also won the award for best brief. This was South Texas's fourth consecutive national title in this competition. In honor of the college's winning streak, the ABA retired the national trophies for best team and best brief, and the Garland R. Walker trophy, to the law school.

September 15. The Robert J. Hogan Visiting Professor's Office was dedicated.

September 25-26. South Texas hosted, and the South Texas chapter of the Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association organized and sponsored, the first-ever national Asian moot court competition, known as the Judge Thomas Tang Moot Court Competition in honor of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals judge.

October. Hon. Charles F. Baird (1980) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Lizabeth P. Matthews (1985) became president of the Alumni Association.

October. Hon. Myron Bright and Hon. Gerald Tjoflat served as jurists-in-residence at South Texas in order to offer students an in-depth look at life on the bench.

October. Two classrooms were dedicated -- one to Dick H. Gregg, a long-time member of the Board of Trustees, and the other to Fred Parks (1937), a generous supporter of the school.

October. The Gay and Lesbian Law Society (GLLS) was formed at South Texas.

October. South Texas won the National Criminal Procedure Moot Court Competition in San Diego. The winning team consisted of Pam Rea (1994) and Jeff Lucas (1993). South Texas won the ABA National Negotiation Competition, held in Boston. The winning team consisted of Melanie Shelnutt (1994) and Brett Shine (1993).

October 17. "Unity in Diversity: An Evening of Multicultural Dances" was sponsored by the International Law Society, the Women's Legal Foundation, and the U.S. Committee for UNICEF. The event was held at the Hyatt Regency and benefited UNICEF medical programs for children in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

October 29. Gaynelle Jones, the first woman and the first African-American to serve as the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Texas, was sworn in at South Texas College of Law.

November. The AIDS clinic was given faculty approval and became South Texas's fourth in-house clinic. Student participants in the clinic worked with attorneys involved in the AIDS project of the Houston Volunteer Lawyer's Program. South Texas won the Starr Insurance Law Moot Court Competition in Hartford, Connecticut. The winning team consisted of Christa Kearney (1994), Jantha Reynolds (1994), and Nathan Rymer (1994).

December 14. Hon. Charles Baird (1980), justice of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, gave the commencement address at Jones Hall. He told the South Texas graduates that they were entering a career in which they will "preserve the dignity, guard the liberties, and protect the rights of the people."

December 30. Lizabeth Matthews (1985), Alumni Association president, was murdered in a robbery attempt; her murder helped focus media attention on violent crime in Houston. In October 1993, Matthews had been named a trustee of the college, becoming the first person to hold the positions of both Alumni Association president and trustee at the same time. Devon Decker (1983) succeeded Matthews as president of the Alumni Association and as a trustee.

^Top^

1994 -- South Texas Opens the Center for Legal Responsibility

The Council for Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) was founded in 1994. It was dedicated to helping law students refine their advocacy skills in negotiations and to helping them learn ADR skills such as mediation.

The second high-profile murder trial of Roger DeGarmo was held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium. The second jury, like the first, found DeGarmo guilty of capital murder and sentenced him to life in prison.

Lawyers from Ecuador participated in an international exchange of ideas while visiting South Texas. The trip was arranged by representatives of the American Bail Bond Institute of Houston. Dean Wilks spoke to the group about the U.S. justice system and the Eighth Amendment right to bail. Ecuador, at the time, had no provision for bail.

The U.S. Department of Education report on student-loan default rates indicated that South Texas students were the least likely of any university or graduate-school students in Texas to default on their loans.

Helen and Harry P. Hutchens Jr. (1956) established a charitable remainder unitrust to benefit South Texas College of Law. The unitrust will eventually provide $250,000 for scholarships to South Texas.

January. South Texas won the Association of the Bar of New York National Moot Court Competition, held in New York City. About the victory Dean Treece commented, "This is the Super Bowl of trial advocacy -- it's the one competition that every student dreams of winning. . . . The win grants our students and South Texas continuing national prestige and honor. . . ." The winning team consisted of Mary Olga Ferguson (1993), Sheila P. Haddock (1994), and Gary R. McLaren (1994). The question for the competition involved medical monitoring and the redemption doctrine, and state regulations on public health.

January. South Texas won the Barristers National Moot Court Competition Finals, also held in New York City. The winning team again consisted of Mary Olga Ferguson (1993), Sheila P. Haddock (1994), and Gary R. McLaren (1994). The team also won for best brief and best oral argument in the final round.

January. The South Texas Law Review celebrated its 40th anniversary. With five hundred total citations, the Law Review had been cited in three U.S. Supreme Court opinions, one Texas attorney general's opinion, five treatises, 366 articles in other law reviews, 20 federal court of appeals opinions, and six federal district court opinions. More than 130 citations were from six states, in such documents as state supreme court and state court of appeals opinions.

January 24. The Princeton Review rated South Texas as being among the top ten law schools in terms of faculty, student satisfaction, and facilities. The faculty at South Texas was rated number six.

January 31. A high-profile breast-implant jury trial was held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

February. South Texas College of Law opened the Center for Legal Responsibility, which provides training in managing conflict, resolving disputes, and devising settlement strategies, to help assure that South Texas graduates are skilled in resolving societal conflict. The center helps oversee the Mediation Clinic, which provides third-party-neutral mediators for cases in Harris County and surrounding counties that require alternative dispute resolution (ADR) procedures.

February. South Texas won the National Security Law Moot Court Competition, held at George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. The winning team consisted of Sheila P. Haddock (1994), Gary R. McLaren (1994), Teresa Myers (1995), and Clay Steely (1994).

February. The school hosted the attorney general debate, with two Republican candidates, Hon. Pat Lykos (1971) and Hon. Don Wittig, participating. The incumbent, Dan Morales, did not participate but went on to prevail in the election.

February 11. The Jessup International Moot Court Competition was hosted at South Texas.

Spring. The South Texas Civil Liberties Association, formed by students concerned about the protection of rights secured by the Bill of Rights, achieved official school status.

Spring. James Passamano (1990), an adjunct professor, began teaching a course on the rights of disabled persons. This was one of the first such law classes taught at the time.

March. South Texas advocates won the Judge Brown Admiralty Law Moot Court Competition at the University of Texas in Austin. The winning team consisted of Kathy Goodman (1995), Natalie Tise (1995), and Monica Vaughan (1995).

March. At the first SBA-sponsored chili cook-off, held on the Garland Walker Terrace, the prize for the best chili went to the "Dons" (the deans of the law school), and the best booth award went to the "Outhouse Chili Gang" (the library staff).

April 8. A symposium entitled "The Attorney-Client Relationship in a Regulated Society," hosted by the Law Review, was held at South Texas. This was the first national symposium hosted by the publication. The annual Law Review Ethics Symposium continues today: the 1998 symposium kicked off South Texas's 75th anniversary year and drew a record crowd.

May 8. Richard "Racehorse" Haynes, renowned criminal defense lawyer, spoke at commencement, held at the George R. Brown Convention Center. He discussed his own career and his perspectives on the practice of law.

June. The June issue of the National Law Journal reported on a survey by the National Jurist that ranked South Texas in the nation's top 40 law schools.

August 13. The South Texas Center for Legal Responsibility presented a series of lectures by distinguished speakers on professional responsibility, ADR, and maintaining balance in life and work.

Fall. The Houston law firm of Croley & Steinberg donated $110,000 to help support the South Texas advocacy program. In appreciation of this gift, the college dedicated room 414T as the Croley & Steinberg Classroom.

Fall. The Marshall, Texas, law firm of Baldwin & Baldwin made a $100,000 pledge to the Center for Legal Responsibility.

Fall. The Jim and Cindy Moriarty Classroom (room 413T) was dedicated in recognition of the Moriartys' support of the South Texas advocacy program. Although a University of Houston Law Center alumnus, Jim Moriarty said he considered South Texas to be his second home.

Fall. The course Civil Rights of Disabled Persons, which was taught by James Passamano (1990) and first offered in the Spring 1994 semester on an experimental basis, became part of the regular curriculum. South Texas was one of only a few law schools in the country to offer the course.

September. Dean Wilks announced he would not seek another term as dean, and a formal search for his replacement began. During the Wilks years, South Texas had established a Center for Legal Responsibility, strengthened and expanded the legal research and writing curriculum, and introduced clinical courses, including one that dealt with disabilities and the law. In addition, the faculty had grown from 36 to 55.

September 23. During the Black Law Students Association mentorship kickoff reception, BLSA began matching its members with Houston-area attorneys who would help these students with law school and give them advice concerning the practice of law.

October. Lizabeth P. Matthews (1985) was posthumously named Distinguished Alumna of the Year.

October. Devon H. Decker (1983) was reelected president of the Alumni Association.

October. The South Texas Council for Alternative Resolutions (CAR) met for the first time.

October 20-22. South Texas won the National Criminal Procedure Moot Court Competition in San Diego. This was the third time in five years that South Texas had won the competition. The winning team consisted of Natalie G. Tise (1995) and Monica Vaughan (1995).

October 24. The Larry Gist Unit, a 2,200-bed prison facility, opened in Beaumont. The facility was named for the Jefferson County Criminal District Court judge, who is an adjunct professor at South Texas.

October 27-29. South Texas won the John Marshall Privacy Law Moot Court Competition in Chicago, taking honors for best overall team and best legal brief. The winning team consisted of Candyce Beneke (1994), Ursula Hall (1995), and Pam Rea (1994). This was the third time in six years that South Texas had won this competition.

October 30. South Texas's Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association was chosen as the 1994 chapter of the year from among all Asian law student groups throughout the United States.

November 1. South Texas swept every award at the University of Connecticut's Starr National Insurance Law Competition, winning for best oralist, best brief, and best overall team. The winning team consisted of James W. Bartlett (1995), Patrice Pujol (1995), Cheryl M. Shooks (1995), and C. Wilson Shirley III (1995) (alternate).

November 10-12. The Board of Advocates hosted the Texas Fall Invitational Mock Trial.

November 16. Dignitaries, scholars, and representatives from Israel, the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), Egypt, Iran, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates gathered at South Texas to discuss the recent Israeli-PLO peace agreement concerning Palestinian self-rule in the West Bank. Under the agreement, Jericho became the first town in the West Bank to come under Palestinian administration.

As part of the conference, a round-table forum entitled "Business, Law, and Diplomacy in the Middle East," cosponsored by South Texas and the Greater Houston Partnership's World Trade Division, was presented in Garrett-Townes Hall. Adjunct professor Marshall Taheri (1973) moderated the forum.

December 13. Judge Janis Jack (1981) of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas gave the commencement address at the George R. Brown Convention Center. She told the graduating class: "There are two axioms to live by as a lawyer: always give something back to the community, and remember, there have never been too many good lawyers."

^Top^

51995 -- Frank "Tom" Read Becomes Dean of the College

The Gay and Lesbian Law Society (GLLS) became recognized as an official student organization.

January. Student enrollment stood at 1,250.

February. South Texas won the Tulane Mardi Gras Invitational National Sports Law Competition in New Orleans. The winning team consisted of Ed Cox (1995), Shannon Robbie (1995), and Monica Vaughan (1995).

February. South Texas won the awards for best team and second-best brief at the 24th annual Judge William Spong Constitutional Law Competition at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The winning team consisted of James W. Bartlett (1995), Maryann Olson (1996), and Jill A. Willard (1996). The issue they argued focused on gender equity in NCAA athletics.

February 24. The South Texas Law Review hosted its second annual Ethics Symposium, entitled "Ethics of the Multijurisdictional Practice of Lawyers." This topic was picked because multijurisdictional practice was becoming more challenging as a result of complex ethical issues and conflicting obligations created in part by the multitude of local rules governing attorney conduct. The symposium, which was held in Garrett-Townes Hall, featured eight speakers and was moderated by Professor Teresa Collett and Judge Frank Evans.

Spring. South Texas implemented a letter grading system, which replaced its numerical system.

Spring. The Part-time Students Association began publishing a legal journal entitled Jus Dicere, meaning to "declare the law."

Spring. South Texas Law Cares was formed to foster a philanthropic spirit among South Texas students. In the fall, the group sponsored the first-ever South Texas Charity Fair.

Spring. Phi Alpha Delta introduced the first student-sponsored résumé seminar, which was attended by approximately 30 students. Speakers included Richard Laminack (1987) of O'Quinn and Laminack and Assistant Dean Kimberly Cauthorn, who discussed her past experiences at Baker & Botts.

Spring. A course on HIV and the Law was offered for the first time at South Texas.

Spring. Professor Charles Weigel led a project to reinter, in a national cemetery, the remains of the Union prisoners of war who died in Camp Groce, a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp near Hempstead, Texas.

Spring. Phi Alpha Phi began issuing the "Highest Grade Award" for most academic courses offered on a regular basis for which a letter grade was given.

Spring. The recently formed Council for Alternative Resolutions (CAR) student group sent its first team to a competition, the Robert Merhige Jr. National Environmental Negotiation Competition, and won the event. The winning team consisted of Ingrid de Graaff (1995) and Linda Kuhn (1996). The students conducted a mock negotiation that involved the Clean Water Act.

Spring. Board member Richard P. Hogan (1961) helped bring an EC/U.S. Comparative Law Symposium to South Texas. At the symposium, barristers, attorneys, and judges from Ireland and the U.S. discussed changing legal issues in a global economy.

Spring. At the annual Spring Dinner Dance, Mabel Welch was recognized for her 20 years of coordinating this event.

March 1. Madalyn Murray O'Hair (1952), South Texas alumna and prominent atheist, and her son Jon Murray spoke in Garrett-Townes Hall. O'Hair's speech was sponsored by the South Texas College of Law Civil Liberties Association.

March 20-24. South Texas conducted its first "thankathon" to thank alumni and friends of the school for their contributions.

April 7. The Black Law Students Association held its first "Celebrating Our Heritage" Appreciation Banquet. The banquet had three objectives: (1) to celebrate the graduation of senior members, (2) to thank BLSA corporate contributors and members, and (3) to install BLSA's 1995-96 officers.

April 7. The Alumni Association presented its first gala, the theme of which was "An Evening in Napa Valley: A Celebration of Wine and Food." The event, chaired by Blanca and Cavanaugh O'Leary (1988), was a resounding success, raising more than $50,000 for student scholarships.

May 9. Texas Attorney General Dan Morales gave the commencement speech at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

Summer. James Passamano (1990) lectured in the United Kingdom about how that country's Disability Discrimination Bill compared with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Summer. South Texas was selected to host the Council on Legal Opportunity's (CLEO) regional summer institute. The purpose of the institute was to provide economically disadvantaged students with an extensive six-week course emphasizing legal analysis, research, and writing. Professor Michael Wheeler and Assistant Dean Elizabeth Dennis (1984) served as coordinators of the institute.

August 1. Frank "Tom" Read became dean of the college. Dean Read, who had been the ABA's deputy consultant on legal education, was regarded as one of the most recognized and respected leaders of the legal community. For South Texas he presented five major goals: (1) prepare for the ABA accreditation inspection; (2) prepare the college's application to join the AALS, (3) maintain momentum in the campaign for the school's new/improved library facilities, (4) assess fund-raising efforts for the proposed new library, and (5) establish a summer study-abroad program at South Texas. Dean Read's long-term goals included offering joint-degree programs, such as a J.D./M.B.A. through another university, while maintaining South Texas's autonomy.

August 29. South Texas won the 1995 ABA National Moot Court Competition, held in conjunction with the ABA's national convention in Chicago. The winning team consisted of Christopher P. Hanslik (1995), Pamela A. Hopper (1995), and Jill A. Willard (1996).

August 29. The South Texas Intellectual Property and Technology Law Society was founded.

Fall. South Texas College of Law formed agreements to be a partner school in two ABA-approved summer programs -- Cumberland Law School of Samford University's program in Durham, England, and Touro College's program in Shimla, India.

Fall. South Texas acquired its own Internet server, and began providing Internet accounts to faculty and students. Soon thereafter, the college created a Web site, which featured general information about South Texas.

Fall. The Florida Law Students Association and Phi Delta Theta sponsored a talk by Tampa criminal defense attorney Frank Ragano in Garrett-Townes Hall. Ragano discussed his colorful career, including his representation of mob figures. One hundred thirty students attended the talk.

Fall. The Center for Legal Responsibility sought volunteers and student workers to assist with its Conflicts Management Mediation Training in the Schools project.

Fall. South Texas students joined with Houston-area medical students to implement a pilot volunteer project, under the direction of Professor Charles Weigel. The purpose of the project was to strengthen relations between the two groups of students, and offer encouragement and friendship to hospitalized children.

Fall. The State Bar of Texas selected South Texas to be the publishing center for the Corporate Counsel Review, which is published by the bar and whose editors are law students.

October. Hon. Miron Love (1951) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Devon H. Decker (1983) was reelected president of the Alumni Association.

November. South Texas won the Starr National Insurance Law Moot Court Competition, held at the University of Connecticut in Hartford. The winning team consisted of Alex E. Garcia (1996), Katherine D. Hayes (1996), and Monte K. Hurst (1996).

November. South Texas won the award for best brief at the Barristers National Moot Court Regional Competition in Oklahoma City.

November 10. At his investiture, Dean Read stressed "competency, responsiveness, and integrity" as values that every lawyer should have and strive to maintain. The ceremony was held at the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium, with more than 250 faculty, alumni, staff, students, and guests attending.

December 5. The Board of Trustees revised the college's plans for its new library. The new plans called for a $10 million addition to the current library building.

December 10. Isaac Hunt, Jr., nominee to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, was the commencement speaker at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

^Top^

1996 -- Dean Read Outlines a Plan of Action

South Texas won the Starr National Insurance Law Moot Court Competition, held at the University of Connecticut in Hartford. The winning team consisted of Matthew R. Beatty (1997), Candace A. Ourso (1997), and Robert L. Paddock (1997).

South Texas won awards for best team and best brief at the ABA National Appellate Advocacy Regionals in New Orleans. The winning team consisted of Melina B. Cain (1996), Christopher P. Nease (1997), and Jill A. Willard (1996).

South Texas won the National Criminal Procedure Moot Court Competition at the University of San Diego. The winning team consisted of Shon T. Dang (1997), Anthony Duckworth (1997), and Michelle R. Herrmann (1997).

January. Former Houston Police Chief Sam Nuchia (1983) was sworn in as a justice of the First Court of Appeals by Chief Justice Michael Schneider in Garrett-Townes Hall.

January 2. Judge Spurgeon Bell died. He was a pillar of the college and one of its strongest driving forces, leaving as his legacy a model of integrity, professionalism, and accomplishment.

February. South Texas won the J. Braxton Craven Moot Court Competition in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The winning team consisted of Susan Fillion (1996), Sean Roberts (1996), and Chris Samuelson (1997).

February. South Texas won the Judge William Spong Constitutional Law Competition, also known as the William and Mary National Moot Court Competition, in Williamsburg, Virginia. The winning team consisted of Martha R. Guice (1997), Christopher P. Nease (1997), and Kathryn M. Stegall (1997).

February. South Texas won the award for best team at the National Security Law Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C. The winning team consisted of Katherine Hayes (1996), Monte Hurst (1996), and Lucretia Marmor (1996). The team also won the award for second-best brief.

February 5. The South Texas Center for Legal Responsibility sponsored the Peer Mediation Program at the George Memorial Library in Richmond, Texas, for students at three Fort Bend County schools. More than 50 seventh- and eighth-grade students completed the program.

February 16. The South Texas Law Review hosted its annual Ethics Symposium on "Lawyers' Duties and Liabilities to Third Parties" in Garrett-Townes Hall. The speakers included Professor Geoffrey Hazzard, Jr., of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Professor John Sutton of the University of Texas School of Law, John Prince of the University of Washington, and John Bauman of South Texas.

February 18. The South Texas Center for Legal Responsibility, along with the Houston Bar Association Section on Alternative Dispute Resolution, Harris County Department of Education, A. A. White Dispute Resolution Center, and Rice University Center for Education, sponsored a Peer Mediation Program.

Spring. South Texas prepared for the ABA's reinspection of the college, conducted every seven years to ensure that the school is in compliance with the association's standards for accreditation, by undertaking a self-study evaluation. Professor Cathy Burnett was chair of the Self-Study Committee. Dean Read said that the self-study and inspection would be useful in helping the college prepare for the upcoming Association of American Law Schools (AALS) inspection.

Spring. South Texas hosted Associate Professor Tom Latrup-Pedersen, pro-dean of the University of Aarhus in Denmark. Latrup-Pedersen taught a four-week course on EC law as part of a student exchange program.

Spring. South Texas was ranked as the 15th-best law school overall in the National Jurist magazine. The college received excellent combined scores for faculty, facilities, and quality of life.

Spring. The Sports and Entertainment Law Society, a South Texas student group, hosted its first-year Sports Law Seminar, which consisted of two panel discussions moderated by South Texas Professor Matt Mitten. The seminar dealt with such issues as race and gender discrimination in sports, antitrust suits, and contract issues in intercollegiate athletics.

March. Dean Read stated that the Hopwood case would not change the admission policies at South Texas. The Fifth Circuit, in Hopwood v. Texas, prohibited the state-supported University of Texas from considering race as a factor in admissions.

March. South Texas won the Robert Mehrige National Environmental Law Regional Competition, sponsored by the T. C. Williams College at the University of Richmond in Virginia. The winning team consisted of South Texas Council of Alternative Resolutions (CAR) members Michael DePonte (1997) and Timothy Williams (1996).

March 28. The 14-member Supreme Court Task Force on Judicial Selection conducted public hearings at South Texas on how the state of Texas selects its judiciary.

April 4. The Health Law Society sponsored a talk at South Texas by Dr. Nancy Dickey, chair of the Board of Trustees of the AMA, on the future of health care in the United States.

April 12. The Alumni Association hosted its second annual gala, with the theme "From Napa with Love: A Celebration of Wine and Food," at the Houston Country Club. Highlights of the gala included a cocktail hour featuring vintners from Napa Valley pairing their signature wines with appetizers prepared by chefs from all over the United States; a gourmet feast; and live and silent auctions. Gala chairs Blanca and Cavanaugh O'Leary (1988) raised more than $70,000 toward the association's Lizabeth Parham Matthews Scholarship Fund.

May. South Texas won the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition, held in conjunction with the annual state bar convention in Dallas. The team, which consisted of Melina B. Cain (1996), Martha R. Guice (1997), and Christopher P. Nease (1997), also swept the competition's individual honors. The competition dealt with Texas constitutional free speech and religion issues.

May 18. Hon. David Hittner of the U.S. District Court gave the commencement speech at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

Summer. South Texas, along with Golden Gate University, sponsored a four-week study-abroad program in Malta. The program's courses, International Business Litigation, International Environmental Law and Law of the Sea, and International Human Rights, were taught by South Texas Professor Ursula Weigold.

Fall. The New Democrats of South Texas was formed.

Fall. The South Texas Law Review held its fourth annual Ethics Symposium, with Teresa Collett and Judge Ruby Sondock as moderators. The theme of the symposium was ethics questions in alternative dispute resolution.

September. For "16 de Septiembre," the Hispanic Law Students Association hosted an atrium fiesta with dances, food, and piñatas, to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and Fiestas Patrias.

September 30. The ABA conducted its reinspection of South Texas and issued a positive report.

October. Gene Locke (1981), Houston's city attorney, received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. M. Karinne McCullough (1987) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 4-6. The South Texas SBA hosted the Fall Roundtable Conference, which featured 120 law students from more than 30 law schools across 10 states and Puerto Rico. The conference is designed to enhance ABA Law Student Division involvement in bar activities. Associate Dean Sandra DeGraw gave the official welcome, and Dean Read hosted a barbecue lunch on Saturday afternoon.

October 8. Hon. Sam Nuchia (1983), former Houston police chief, gave a talk entitled "A Lawyer as Police Chief" in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

^Top^

1997 -- The AALS Inspects South Texas

Professor Olga Moya was named as one of the top twelve Hispanics in the law by the Miller Brewing Co. She was featured on a 1997 calendar entitled "Pillars of a Just Society: Hispanics in the Law."

The South Texas Civil Liberties Journal was published for the first time.

For the second year in a row, the Sports and Entertainment Law Society was recognized as the most outstanding student organization on campus.

The first meeting of the "Old Elephants" was held. This group consists of past Alumni Association presidents who serve as advisers to Dean Read on alumni matters.

The Alumni Association unanimously approved the Austin-Area Alumni Chapter as its first official chapter.

Louis Silverman (1979) established the Alex Silverman Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund at South Texas in honor of his father.

January. A portrait of distinguished alumnus and former South Texas Board chair Joe M. Green, Jr., was presented to the college. The portrait was displayed outside the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

January. Four students from South Texas were selected to fill liaison positions with the Law Student Division of the American Bar Association.

January 14. South Texas closed because of an ice storm, which led to the cancellation of the first day of classes and delayed the posting of grades.

February 10. Arthur Miller, a distinguished Harvard Law professor, spoke at South Texas for West Bar Review on federal civil procedure.

February 13. A memorial dinner was held for Hon. Spurgeon E. Bell, to honor Judge Bell's life and accomplishments.

February 24. Molly Smith, wife of Ed Smith, chair emeritus of the college's Board of Directors and benefactor of the college, died.

Spring. The college changed its academic deficiency policy by implementing the "First Semester Rule," which stated that a student would be automatically dismissed if his or her GPA fell below 2.0.

Spring. Approximately 60 middle school and junior high school children graduated from the Fort Bend County Peer Mediation Program. Under the program, the South Texas Center for Legal Responsibility taught students techniques for handling conflict nonviolently through talking and reasoning.

March. The AALS team inspected South Texas, as part of the college's application for AALS membership.

March. South Texas won the awards for best team and best brief at the J. Braxton Craven National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition, held at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The winning team consisted of Sherry L. Bankhead (1998), Jacquelyn A. Chandler (1997), and T. Neal Nobles (1998).

March 31. Mabel Welch, director of special activities, retired after 21 years of service to South Texas. She had also served as director of public affairs and alumni affairs.

April. South Texas honored its advocacy program with a reception, during which a plaque listing the college's national-competition victories was unveiled. The large plaque hangs in the main hallway near our Liberty Bell replica.

April. The Alumni Association hosted its third annual gala, with the theme "Sojourn to Sonoma: A Celebration of Wine and Food," at the Houston Country Club. Highlights of the gala included a cocktail hour featuring vintners from Sonoma Valley pairing their signature wines with appetizers prepared by chefs from all over the United States; a gourmet feast; and live and silent auctions. Gala chairs Fran and Bob Dunn (1965) raised more than $55,000 toward the association's Garland R. Walker Scholarship Fund.

April. The Technology Department was formed to centralize the technology services of the college. Subsequently, the South Texas Web site was expanded, to include a variety of features, such as information on the college's 75th anniversary activities, affiliation with Texas A&M University, alumni services, continuing legal education program, faculty, and student organizations.

April 2. At a carnival sponsored by the SBA, Westlaw, and Bar-Bri, the featured attraction was "Dunk Your Favorite Professor."

April 17. The Christian Legal Society hosted the "Festival of Praise," a celebration of music, worship, and fellowship held in the atrium at South Texas. The event featured the unveiling of the U.S. and Texas flags, donated by the graduating class of 1997 and the family of long-time South Texas professor Charles "Lew" Blood, that now fly outside our front entrance. Money for the Texas flag was raised through a class of 1997 fund-raising drive, which included a carnival raffle in the atrium and individual donations by students.

April 27. Addie Heaton, administrative assistant to Dean Garland R. Walker, died.

May 18. Rennard Strickland, dean of the Oklahoma City University School of Law, gave the commencement speech at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

June. South Texas honored the Williams Bailey Law Firm for its generous donation to the advocacy program by dedicating room 417T as the Williams Bailey Classroom.

June 26. Dean William J. Williamson died. Dean Williamson served as interim dean from 1984 through 1986, and became dean in early 1986. He first began teaching at South Texas in 1941. During his deanship, he led the college in a remarkable transition from being a largely part-time night school, with a faculty hired on a local level, to a full-time institution, with a faculty recruited nationwide.

Summer. The South Texas SBA was recognized by the ABA for outstanding achievements, and was selected as "SBA of the Year" for the SBA's Western Division.

July 3. An admissions seminar hosted by South Texas and cosponsored by the University of Houston and Texas Southern University drew five hundred prospective law students, who received information on how to get into law school and how to finance a legal education.

July 23. Hon. Norman W. Black, who served as the chief judge for the Federal District Court for the Southern District of Texas and was a South Texas adjunct professor, died on vacation in Colorado.

August. South Texas won all honors (best team, finalist-team best brief, and best speaker) at the 1997 ABA National Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Competition, held in Austin. The winning team consisted of Michelle R. Herrmann (1997), who was also named best individual speaker; Graig J. Alvarez (1997); and Candace A. Ourso (1997). This was the fourth time in the previous five years that South Texas had captured the ABA title, and the win represented South Texas's 59th national moot court and mock trial championship. The issue before the mock supreme court concerned the status of affirmative action in the wake of the Hopwood decision.

August. With the installation of the new South Texas computer network, computer users were able to access library materials and school departments, and exchange information more easily. Students were provided with personal network accounts, which gave them access to the system.

Fall. South Texas hosted five Danish law students as part of a cooperative exchange with the University of Aarhus School of Law, Aarhus, Denmark.

Fall. South Texas, along with the South Texas chapter of the Sports and Entertainment Law Society, hosted the Invitational Sports and Entertainment Law Negotiation Competitions.

Fall. Hillel at South Texas became known as the Jewish Law Students Association.

Fall. South Texas won the John Marshall Moot Court Competition in Information and Privacy Law, held in Chicago. The team, which consisted of Michelle R. Herrmann (1997), Jennifer L. Johnson (1997), and Candace A. Ourso (1997), also won the Best Writing Award for best brief. The team was coached by Assistant Dean T. Gerald Treece and attorney Natalie Tise. This was the 60th national title won by South Texas advocacy teams in the 15 years that the college had been in active competition.

September 18. Hon. Sam Nuchia (1983) was initiated as an honorary member of Phi Delta Phi at South Texas.

October. Hon. Sam Nuchia (1983) received the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

October. Joe A. Garnett (1985) became president of the Alumni Association.

October. The first "Atrium Party Festival" was held. Entertainment lawyer Al Staeghely provided insight into the practice of law in the music and movie fields, as well as describing his own experiences as a musician.

December. South Texas won the first-place award at the Judge William F. Starr National Insurance Law Moot Court Competition, hosted by the University of Connecticut and the Hartford Insurance Company. The winning team consisted of Jonathan Horowitz (1998), Sandra J. Howard (1998), and J. Todd Trombley (1998).

^Top^

1998 -- AALS Membership and Link with TAMU Herald 75 Years of Excellence in Legal Education

January. South Texas secured start-up funding from Rockwell Fund, Inc., to establish a precedent-setting on-line research and historical project, known as the South Texas Electronic Publishing (STEP) initiative.

The Alumni Association unanimously approved its second official chapter -- the Corpus Christi Chapter.

South Texas hosted the ABA 13th Circuit Spring Conference.

January 9. On a landmark day, South Texas College of Law was admitted as a member school into the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) by a unanimous vote of the AALS House of Representatives. The AALS is considered the learned society for legal education.

January 23. South Texas's dean and president, Frank "Tom" Read, and Texas A&M's president, Dr. Ray Bowen, signed an affiliation agreement between the two schools, which represented a first for both institutions. It gave Texas A&M, the oldest public educational institution in the state, a direct relationship with a law school, and gave South Texas affiliation with a major university and resulting name recognition.

The affiliation was not a merger or a consolidation. South Texas, now known as South Texas College of Law affiliated with Texas A&M University, retained its private status. The affiliation did make South Texas the exclusive provider of legal services for Texas A&M. This private/public partnership is unique in the annals of legal education.

Dr. Bowen regarded the affiliation agreement, which represented the culmination of 30 years of effort, as one of the five most important events in the history of Texas A&M.

February. The advocates of South Texas won top team honors and most of the individual awards at the Round Robin National Moot Court Competition, held at the Shepard Broad Law Center, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This marked the school's first advocacy win since South Texas's groundbreaking affiliation with Texas A&M. The winning team consisted of James A. Edwards (1999), Ricardo R. Lopez (1999), and Bridgett M. Overlease (1999).

February 9. South Texas received a generous gift of $100,000 from Clear Lake attorney Ronald Krist in memory of his brother, Stanley Krist (1967), a noted Houston trial attorney.

March 26. The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board requested an Attorney General's opinion on the legality of the affiliation agreement signed with Texas A&M University in January.

March 29. South Texas advocates captured first place at the 1998 Judge Evan A. Evans Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition, held in Madison, Wisconsin. The South Texas team of Adraon D. Greene (1999), Chastiti N. Horne (1998), and J. Todd Trombley (1998) defeated Emory University in the final round. The competition, in which law students argue fictional cases before a mock supreme court, was judged by members of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

April 13. South Texas filed a request for a declaratory judgment in Travis County court to validate the affiliation agreement. Dean Read and the Board of Directors decided to seek an enforceable opinion rather than the advisory opinion of the AG's office. The case was assigned to Judge Suzanne Covington.

April 16. Forty-six student initiates were honored and admitted into Phi Delta Phi, Wood Inn. With these initiates, the South Texas inn became the largest in Texas and among the largest internationally.

April 24. The South Texas Alumni Association held its fourth annual gala, the theme of which was "European Elegance: Celebrating European Wine and Food." Gala chairs Janice and Bill Anderson (1965) raised more than $90,000 toward the Lizabeth Parham Matthews Scholarship Fund.

April 30. South Texas and Texas A&M University announced a revision in the school's name. The school's name was changed to "South Texas College of Law affiliated with Texas A&M University."

May 1. Professor Charles Weigel was selected as a Piper Professor of 1998 by the Minnie Stevens Piper Foundation of San Antonio. Professor Weigel was the first South Texas professor to receive the honor in the program's 40-year history. The Piper Professor Program honors professors who are well-rounded, outgoing, and devoted to the profession, and who have made a special impact on students and the community.

June 12. South Texas won first place at the State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition in Corpus Christi. The winning team consisted of Twila L. Baker (1999), Kevin G. Cain (1999), and Brent M. Cordell (1999). The team argued a moot court case involving an in-house counsel's claim for wrongful termination and whether evidence and ethical rules permitted disclosure of confidential client information to prove his claim. South Texas has won the state title more often than any other law school in the history of the competition.

Summer. South Texas joined with four other independent law schools--California Western School of Law, New England School of Law, Stetson University College of Law, and William Mitchell College of Law--to create a unique academic partnership, the Consortium for Innovative Legal Education. The consortium's initial activities have included conducting an intensive, two-week course abroad on European legal systems and developing an LL.M. degree in Advanced Litigation Management for experienced practitioners. The first two modules of this latter program are being offered at William Mitchell and California Western. Future consortium initiatives may include faculty exchanges and distance-learning programs.

September 24. The college launched its 75th Anniversary Symposium Series with the sixth annual South Texas Law Review Ethics Symposium, whose topic was "The Lawyer's Duty to Promote the Common Good." The five-part Symposium Series, which featured international, national, and local experts, was the most extensive conference program ever held at South Texas. Rounding out the series were symposiums on "The Science of Proof," held in November; "International Comparative Federalism in the Devolution Era," held in January; "Popular Understanding of Law," held in February; and "Emerging Professional Responsibility Issues in Litigation," held in March.

October. Joe A. Garnett (1985) was reelected president of the Alumni Association.

October 16. South Texas kicked off its 75th anniversary celebration with a special event to raise funds for its proposed new campus courtroom, to be named in honor of longtime advocacy director T. Gerald Treece. The event, held at the Hyatt Regency Ballroom in downtown Houston, featured a roast of Dean Treece that was presented in the form of a trial. Following the trial, which included videotaped "testimony" against Dean Treece by such Houston celebrities as "Mattress Mac," Larry Dierker, and Bob Lanier, courtroom participants paid a moving tribute to Treece for his 20 years of service to South Texas. The event also featured the presentation of the Distinguished Alumna Award to Judge Janis Jack (1981), who appeared as the judge in Dean Treece's trial.

December 2. South Texas and Texas A&M University electronically linked the two institutions' libraries, allowing for a seamless flow of information to and from each facility.

December 28. The American Bar Association and Association of American Law Schools signed off on the terms of the affiliation agreement between South Texas and Texas A&M University.

^Top^

1999 -- College Names New Library Addition for Fred Parks at Ceremonial Groundbreaking

January 29. South Texas won the awards for best team and best argument at the 49th Annual Association of the Bar of the City of New York National Moot Court Competition, the oldest moot court competition in the nation. The winning team consisted of Kevin G. Cain (1999), Brent M. Cordell (1999), and Twila L. Grooms (1999). Grooms was also named best individual speaker.

March 31.  Judge Suzanne Covington of the 201st State District Court in Travis County ruled in favor of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s motion for summary judgment in the dispute over the South Texas/Texas A&M affiliation agreement. Therefore, the affiliation agreement was voided. South Texas filed a motion to reconsider and a motion to clarify Judge Covington’s ruling.

April 8-10. South Texas capped off its 75th anniversary celebration with a three-day reunion weekend filled with alumni activities: two CLEs, one on past and present law office technology and the other on past and present courtroom technology (featuring a reenactment of the 1935 Lindbergh kidnapping trial); student-led tours of the South Texas campus; class and student-organization reunions; and the fifth annual Alumni Association gala, whose theme was "South Texas Revisits the 1920s."

April 18. South Texas teams finished first and second in the 25th Annual American Bar Association National Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago. The first-place team, consisting of Kevin G. Cain (1999), Angie C. Davis (1999), and Twila L. Grooms (1999), also won the award for best brief. Placing second were classmates Brent M. Cordell (1999), Chris G. King (1999), and Bridgett M. Overlease (1999).

August 3. Judge Suzanne Covington granted the Coordinating Board's motion for summary judgment and included an injunction against the majority of the governance provisions of the affiliation agreement, including the use of Texas A&M University's name by South Texas. The injunction did not affect the academic portions of the agreement, leaving intact the linking of the libraries, faculty exchanges, three-three programs, and joint degrees. South Texas and Texas A&M University announced plans to appeal.

October. Terrie L. Sechrist (1986) became president of the Alumni Association.

October 14. A crowd of over 300 gathered on the Garland Walker Terrace to celebrate Founders' Day and to witness the ceremonial groundbreaking for the college's new five-story, high-tech library addition. The Founders' Day celebration featured the presentation of the Distinguished Alumnus Award to Fred Parks (1937) for his noteworthy 60-year legal career. The groundbreaking ceremony featured a surprise announcement by Dean Read: Because Mr. Parks had recently pledged a substantial gift to the library's Capital Campaign, the new facility would be named in his honor.

^Top^

2000 - The Supreme Court of Texas Visits the College

February. South Texas advocates won the 23rd Annual National Moot Court Invitational Competition at the University of North Carolina. Team members were Matt Caligur (2001), Shalimar Simon (2001), and Kelton Tonn (2001).

February. Advocates captured the college’s 70th national moot court title by winning the National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition at William and Mary School of Law in Williamsburg, Virginia. The team consisted of Robert Cowan (2001), Alexandra Hogan (2001), and Mark Junell (2001). The team was also awarded the top prize for best written brief.

February 23. Dean Tom Read announced the college’s new summer program in Malta.

March. Advocates claimed the number-one spot at the Judge Evans National Constitutional Law Competition at the University of Wisconsin. The team members were Misty Hataway (2001), Joshua Davis (2001), and Paul Grinke (2001).

April 4. South Texas hosted a hate crimes forum as one of six U.S. law schools selected by the ABA to host “Diversity Day” programs. Judy Shepard, mother of slain Wyoming college student Matthew Shepard, spoke at the college with others concerning stronger hate crime legislation. Other speakers were Texas Senators Rodney Ellis and Mario Gallegos, Jr., Jasper County District Attorney Pat Hardy (1981), Texas Representative Scott Hochberg, Houston attorney Mitchell Katine (1985), and Houston City Councilman Gordon Quan (1977). Professor Neil McCabe (1982) moderated.

May. The Alumni Association gala, “Millennium Masquerade,” was held in the ballroom of the Rice Hotel.

May 3. Family and friends of Texas A&M bonfire-collapse victim Christopher Breen established the Christopher Breen Memorial Scholarship. Breen’s brother, Sean E. Breen, is a 1992 graduate of South Texas and the administrator of his brother’s estate. The scholarship is awarded annually to a student in the South Texas advocacy program who has shown the most improvement and overcome the odds to succeed in law school.

May 21. Henry L. Solano, solicitor at the U.S. Department of Labor, was the speaker at the spring commencement ceremony.

May 21. The college announced the establishment of three endowed distinguished professorships to honor law professors for their dedication to legal education. Professor Elaine A. Carlson (1979) was designated the Stanley J. Krist Distinguished Professor of Texas Law, Associate Dean T. Gerald Treece was named the W. James Kronzer Distinguished Professor of Advocacy, and Professor Charles Weigel was named the Spurgeon E. Bell Distinguished Professor of Law.

September 15. Pamela Earthman (1987) was elected president of the Alumni Association.

October. The South Texas team of Alexandra Hogan (2001), Matt Caligur (2001), and Mark Callender (2001) won top honors at the National Moot Court Competition in Information Technology and Privacy Law held at John Marshall Law School in Chicago. The team also won the awards for best brief and best petitioner’s brief.

October 2. The Supreme Court of Texas en banc heard oral arguments in Garrett-Townes Hall and later were honored at a reception held in the atrium.

October 3. Judge Kenneth W. Starr, former independent counsel investigating President Bill Clinton, met with the college’s faculty, staff, and students for a town-hall type meeting.

October 6. The Fourth Annual Student Bar Association Food Drive, a weeklong effort to benefit the Houston Food Bank, generated donations of over 25,000 cans and non perishable food items.

October 25. The Black Law Students Association hosted a symposium on the death penalty in Garrett-Townes Hall. Speakers included State Representative Sylvester Turner, Professor Shelby A. D. Moore, Jim Harrington of the Texas Civil Rights Project, and Will Harrell of the ACLU.

October 27. The Republican Law Students Association sponsored a candidates’ forum in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium. Candidates in four races were represented: in the 25th U.S. Congressional District, incumbent Ken Bentsen and challenger Phil Sudan; in the 137th State Congressional district, incumbent Debra Danberg and challenger David Cubberly; in the 15th State Senate District, incumbent John Whitmire and challenger Warren Lawless; and for the First Court of Appeals, incumbent Eric Andell and challenger Terry Jennings.

November. Advocates won the college’s 73rd national title, claiming the best team honor at the National Health Law Moot Court Competition at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. The team members were Craig Bohn (2001), Shalimar Simon (2001), and Michael Wallis (2001).

November 9. The college’s Founders’ Day celebration featured a tribute to Dean Garland R. Walker.

November 9. Jeffrey E. Rusk (1983) was honored as Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.

November 20. Classroom 516 was dedicated as the Thomas W. (1990) and Ryland A. Pirtle Classroom.

November 30. The Third Court of Appeals in Austin, in a split decision, ruled that the Texas A&M University Board of Regents did not have the power to sign an affiliation agreement with South Texas.

  ^Top^

2001 - September 11th Affects the Nation

February. South Texas advocates won their 74th national moot court title when they were named co-champions of the William B. Spong, Jr., Invitational Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition in Williamsburg, Virginia.  The judges of the national competition were unable to select a clear winner of the contest, opting to name South Texas and Brigham Young co-champions. The South Texas team, which consisted of Natalie Koehler (2002), Michael Westbrook (2002), and Warren Wills (2002), also won the top award for best written brief, and Koehler was named top advocate of the competition.

February 26. Two faculty members, Sandra J. Carnahan and Mark Steiner, assumed new positions as assistant professors; the two had previously taught legal research and writing at South Texas.  The college also added another new assistant professor, Charles W. “Rocky” Rhodes, who had previously taught part-time at Baylor University School of Law while practicing appellate law with Locke, Liddell & Sapp in Austin.

March 1. The Third Court of Appeals in Austin rejected the motion for rehearing filed by Texas A&M University and South Texas concerning their affiliation agreement.  The Executive Committee of the South Texas Board of Directors then authorized South Texas to seek review by the Supreme Court of Texas.

March 9. Professor Jean Powers was named director of Continuing Legal Education, and would assume that position on June 1st.

April. South Texas advocates captured the school’s 75th national advocacy title in Chicago at the 30th Annual American Bar Association Moot Court Competition. The winning team, which consisted of Robert W. Cowan (2001), Ann E. Johnson (2001), and Mark A. Junell (2001), also won the award for best-written brief of the tournament.

April. The college racked up national advocacy championship number 76 when South Texas students won the Vanderbilt/Freedom Forum First Amendment Moot Court Competition in Tennessee. The winning team consisted of Shalimar A. Simon (2001), and Michael H. Wallis (2001).

April. Student advocates claimed their 77th national title at the Judge John R. Brown Admiralty Law Moot Court Competition in Newport, Rhode Island. The team of James T. Bailey (2001), Jaime E. Rocha (2002), and Meredith F. Rushing (2002), also wrote the competition’s best brief, and Bailey was named best speaker of the tournament.

April. Professor Timothy Zinnecker was granted tenure and promoted to full professor by the South Texas Board.

May. The Seventh Annual Alumni Association gala was held with the theme of “Noche Extravagante.”

May 19. Former independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr was the commencement speaker at graduation, held at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

June 9. Tropical Storm Allison swept through the Houston area, flooding numerous neighborhoods as well as the UH and TSU law libraries and the basement of the Harris County Law Library, rendering the county building unusable for a while. The college’s new Fred Parks Law Library was the only major law library in the city unaffected by the flood. Consequently, the library’s patron count rose dramatically during the summer, and the UH Law Center held classes on the South Texas campus during the summer months.

August. Two legal research and writing professors joined the faculty for the fall semester. Professor Candyce T. Beneke (1994) was a permanent addition to the program, and Professor Tracy McGaugh began serving as a visiting professor.

September 11. Classes were dismissed after the college received word of the terrorist attacks on the United States in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania.

October. South Texas teams placed first, second, and third in the Annual State Bar of Texas Administrative and Public Law Moot Court Competition held in Austin. The winning team, which consisted of Delia Reyna (2002), Wade Vandiver (2002), and Wendy Yates (2002), also won the best written brief award, and Vandiver was named best speaker of the competition.

October 12. The college held its annual Ethics Symposium on the topic “The Ethics of Judicial Selection.”

October 18. Alumnus Fred Parks (1937) died at the age of 95, less than a month before the dedication of the college’s new law library, which was named in his honor.  A prominent civil lawyer in Houston for 50 years, Mr. Parks had made the biggest gift to the college’s “Power of One” Capital Campaign, the fundraising initiative for the new facility.

October 18. A mayoral debate between incumbent mayor Lee Brown and challengers Chris Bell (1992) and Orlando Sanchez, both Houston city council members, was held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

October 22. Because of limited space in the Harris County criminal courts building, the case of Texas v. Richard Walker was heard in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.  Both attorneys in the case, prosecutor Casey O’Brien (1980) and defense attorney Dan Cogdell (1982), were South Texas alumni.

November. Student advocates took first and second place at the National Health Law Moot Court Competition, held at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. The winning team, which consisted of Kirsten Barron (2001), Patrick Cohoon (2001) and Chad Seely (2002), also won the award for best written legal brief. This was South Texas’s 78th national advocacy title.

November 1. A second mayoral debate, this one between incumbent mayor Lee Brown and runoff challenger Orlando Sanchez, was held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

November 14. With Former President George H. W. Bush as keynote speaker, the college dedicated its new Fred Parks Law Library in a ceremony held in the atrium. Fred Parks (1937) for whom the library was named, had died less than one month before the dedication ceremony at age 95.

November 15. The Supreme Court of Texas denied the petition from South Texas and Texas A&M University for review of their affiliation agreement.

December 6. A gift of $10 million was bequeathed to the college by Fred Parks in his will.  South Texas planned to use the new funds, which were to be placed in the college’s endowment, for numerous new scholarships and endowed professorships.  With a total of over $13 million in gifts to the college, including the $3 million he donated to help fund the construction of the Fred Parks Law Library, Mr. Parks became the largest donor in South Texas history.

  ^Top^

2002 - The Affiliation Fight Ends

January 10. Professor Elaine G. Carlson (1979) was named a member of the prestigious American Law Institute (ALI).  Professor Carlson is the Stanley J. Krist Distinguished Professor of Texas Law, and has taught at South Texas since 1980.

February. South Texas advocates won their 79th national advocacy title at the 25th Annual National Invitational Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition, held at the University of North Carolina. The winning team consisted of Tara Collins (2002), Rebecca Durrett (2002), and J-D Schacht (2002).

February. Advocates captured the top spot at the George Washington University National Security Law Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C.  The team, which consisted of Sheri Caldwell (2002), Buffy Martines (2002), and Brent Mayr (2002), also won the award for best-written legal brief.  This was the 80th national title earned by South Texas in moot court and mock trial competitions.

February 22. A panel discussion entitled the “The Establishment of International Criminal Court” was hosted by the International Law Society in the Slohm Room of the Fred Parks Law Library.

March 21. The Supreme Court of Texas, after an en banc evaluation, denied the South Texas and Texas A&M University petition for review. This ended the litigation related to the affiliation agreement signed by South Texas and Texas A&M on January 23, 1998.  The end result was that the formal affiliation agreement was voided, but the two schools continued to work together in a number of academic initiatives, including joint classes and a 3/3 bachelor’s degree/law degree program.

March 27. In a forum held in Garrett-Townes Hall, Republican Law Students Association members Jason Fowell (2003), Ryan Campbell (2004), and Adam Elrod (2004) debated South Texas ACLU members Emily Patterson (2004), Chris Attig (2003), and Jason Moore (2004), on the topic of the war in Iraq.

April 4. The Black Law Students Association held a slavery reparations forum to explore the idea of proposed reparations to relatives of slaves held in the U.S.  The forum featured Dr. Imari Obadale, professor of Political Science, Prairie View A&M University; Simon Wiltz of the National Coalition for Blacks for Reparations in America; and Houston attorney Jermaine Thomas (2001). The discussion was moderated by Professor Shelby Moore.

April 8. Dean Frank “Tom” Read announced his intention to step down as dean on August 1, 2003.

April 19. The South Texas College of Law Board of Directors granted tenure to four professors: Paul McGreal, Francesca Ortiz, Val D. Ricks, and Kevin Yamamoto.  The South Texas faculty currently consists of 58 full-time professors and approximately 40 adjunct professors.

June 17. A reenactment of the Andrea Yates insanity trial was held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium. The sponsors were South Texas and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center.

June 21. At a one-hour roundtable meeting in Garrett-Townes Hall, the general counsels of four energy companies discussed the changes to the energy industry brought about by the collapse of Enron.  The forum was part of a two-day Power Institute Program put on by the law school.  Participating in the discussion were Vincent Duane, vice president and general counsel for Mirant Americas Energy Marketing; Keith L. Head, senior vice president and general counsel for Duke Energy North America; John C. Herbert, senior vice president and general counsel for Dynegy Marketing and Trading; and Mike Jines, senior vice president and general counsel for Wholesale Group Reliant Resources. The program’s moderator was Houston attorney Bret Strong (1995), of Winstead Sechrest & Minick P.C.

August 14. South Texas added four new professors to its faculty: Brady Coleman, Maxine Goodman, Robert Holland, and Tracy McGaugh.

August 30. Houston lawyers John O’Quinn, Rick Laminack (1987), and Tom Pirtle (1990), pledged the lead gift of $1.5 million for the construction of the new, state-of-the-art T. Gerald Treece Courtroom.  Another $450,000 in gifts and pledges was donated by South Texas graduates.

September 17. Houston attorney Joel Androphy (1978) was named Distinguished Alumnus of the year.

October 17. A panel discussion entitled “The Legal Legacy of 9-11: Cyberterrorism,” sponsored by the Intellectual Property and Technology Law Society, was held in the Slohm Room of the Fred Parks Law Library.

October 17. The Hispanic Law Students Association and Republican Law Students Association co-hosted a candidate’s forum in Garrett-Townes Hall.  Some twenty candidates, who were running for national and state legislative posts as well as judgeships, each made a policy speech and then answered questions from the public.

October 18. The 9th annual Ethics Symposium, on the topic “The Ethics of Litigation,” was held in Garrett-Townes Hall.

November. South Texas advocates were named champions of the National Health Law Moot Court Competition, held at Southern Illinois University. The team consisted of Sheri L. Caldwell (2002), Tara L. Collins (2002), and Rebecca B. Durrett (2002).  This was the 81st national title earned by a South Texas team.

November 22. South Texas hosted a bioterrorism forum in the Slohm Room of the Fred Parks Law Library.  Experts explored the medical and legal issues raised by the Center for Disease Control’s proposed response to a smallpox bioterrorism attack.  Participating were: Medical Ethics Professor Rosemary Quigley of the Baylor College of Medicine; Doctor Katherine Rathbun of the LSU School of Medicine; and Professor Harvey Peltier of the LSU School of Law.  This was the second forum in the series “The Legal Legacy of 9/11” hosted by South Texas.

December. The South Texas College of Law Board of Directors granted tenure to Professor Bruce McGovern at its December meeting.

December 15. Texas Supreme Court Justice Nathan L. Hecht was the guest speaker at the college’s commencement, held in Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

December 16. Demolition began in the old vacated library space to clear way for construction of the new T. Gerald Treece Courtroom.

  ^Top^

2003 - Dean Alfini Takes the Helm

February 5. Professor Paul E. McGreal was named the inaugural recipient of the Harry and Helen Hutchens Research Professorship. The special designation is bestowed on a professor who has demonstrated an outstanding ability to write and publish articles on an array of legal topics and shows promise for sustained productivity.  The professorship is awarded for four years and is designed to recognize and encourage high-quality scholarship.

February 10. South Texas announced a collaboration with the Norwich Law School of the University of East Anglia in England to offer international legal education.  Under the program, five British law students study at South Texas each semester as part of their legal studies degree, while ten South Texas graduates a year are accepted into the Norwich LLM program for half the standard tuition.  Additionally, each year a South Texas student will be chosen to receive the Sir Edward Coke Scholarship, which pays the full tuition at Norwich.

February 26. South Texas formally broke ground this week on the T. Gerald Treece Courtroom, a $3 million high-tech teaching facility to be used by the faculty for trial advocacy classes, by the advocacy program for team-practice activities, advocacy competitions, awards ceremonies, and by the Houston legal community for ceremonial events and actual trials and appellate hearings.

February 27. James J. Alfini, a professor and former dean at Northern Illinois University College of Law, was chosen as the ninth president and dean of South Texas College of Law.  His deanship would begin on August 1.

April 12. The Alumni Association gala, whose theme was “Legends in Black and White,” was held at the Inter-Continental Hotel. 

May 19. South Texas announced that it would administer a new program to provide student assistance to members of the Defense Bar Association of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague.  The program allows students to spend a semester abroad assisting in the preparation of cases, including interviewing witnesses, preparing witness summaries, observing court procedures, and researching and drafting memos.

May 24. Counsel to the President Alberto R. Gonzales spoke at the college commencement, which was held at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

June. South Texas students earned the top spot at the annual State Bar of Texas moot court competition.  The South Texas team consisted of Inger Hampton (2003), Daniel Johnson (2004), and Kyle Watson (2004).

June 9. South Texas received $5.2 million from the Fred Parks Foundation, the second payment on a $10 million bequeathment from the will of Parks, who passed away in 2001.

August 1. The new president and dean of South Texas College of Law, James J. Alfini, formally assumed his duties.

August 1. Kathleen A. Bergin and Dru Stevenson joined South Texas as new law professors.

September 17. Imogen “Immy” Papadopoulos (1984), a member of the college’s board of directors, was named the Distinguished Alumna of the year at the annual meeting of the Alumni Association. The association also named Greg Bopp (1995) as its new president.

October. South Texas advocates placed first in the 6th Annual Administrative and Public Law Moot Court Competition in Austin.  The winning team, which consisted of Jason Newman (2004), Donna Tomlinson-Smith (2003), and Jared LeBlanc (2004), also won the best brief prize, and Newman was also named best oralist.

October 9. James J. Alfini was inaugurated as the ninth president and dean of South Texas College of Law in a formal ceremony held in the Joe M. Green, Jr., Auditorium.

November 11. The new T. Gerald Treece Courtroom was dedicated with a ceremony held in the atrium. The college’s special guests at the ceremony were the entire bench of the Supreme Court of Texas at the time, which consisted of eight members. Following the dedication, a reception was held in both the atrium and the new courtroom space.

November 12. The Supreme Court of Texas heard three cases from the Houston area in the new T. Gerald Treece Courtroom as part of the facility’s dedication events.

December 10. The South Texas Board of Directors elected a new chairman, Don D. Jordan (1969), who was retired chairman and chief executive officer of Reliant Energy.  Jordan, who had served on the board since 1991, replaces Harry Hutchens, a 1956 South Texas graduate who served on the board for 29 years and as chairman since 1997. Hutchens now assumed the title of Chair Emeritus.

  ^Top^

2004 - The Corporate Compliance Center Opens

February. The South Texas Board of Directors adopted a strategic plan to guide the college for the next five years. The plan was developed by the board's Strategic Planning Committee, chaired by Jim Sales, and contained new mission and vision statements, goals, objectives, and initiatives for the college. Included in the plan was the designation of five Centers of Excellence at South Texas: the Advocacy Program, the Law Institute for Medical Studies, the Frank Evans Center for Conflict Resolution, the Transactional Skills Center, and the Corporate Compliance Center.

February. South Texas took first place in the largest national moot court competition of the year, the Association of the Bar of the City of New York Competition. The team of Daniel Johnson (2004), Kenny Corley (2004), and Marit Babin (2004) claimed the best team title, while Corley was named best speaker of the final round. This was the 83rd national title for South Texas.

February. South Texas advocates won the Judge William B. Spong, Jr., National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition at William and Mary School of Law in Williamsburg, Virginia. The team of Nicole James, Taneka Johnson, and Justin Keiter also won the award for best written legal brief. This was the 84th national competition won by South Texas.

February. South Texas advocates defeated Cleveland-Marshall in the final round of the inaugural National Animal Law Moot Court Competition to claim their 85th national advocacy title.  The South Texas team members were Melissa Bush (2004), Juan Garcia (2004), and Daniel Johnson (2004).

March. South Texas students won the Judge Evan A. Evans National Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition, held at the University of Wisconsin. The winning team consisted of Josh Maness (2004), and Ryan Zehl (2004).  This was the 86th national advocacy title earned by a South Texas team.

March 11. The inaugural lecture of the Fred Parks Distinguished Lecture Series was held in Garrett-Townes Hall.  The event’s featured speaker was David W. Leebron, outgoing dean of Columbia University School of Law and newly named president of Rice University.

March 11. The newly created South Texas Visitors’ Committee, whose function is to provide advice to the college in a number of areas, attended tours, meetings, and breakout sessions on the South Texas campus.

April. Student advocates won the national championship at the American Bar Association National Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Competition. The victory by team members Kenny Corley (2004), Lauren Williams (2004), and Matt Reed (2004), raised the college’s winning record to 87 national championships.

April 17. The Alumni Association gala, whose theme was “Jazzed About South Texas,” was held at the Inter-Continental Hotel. 

April 29. The college announced that retiring Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas R. Phillips would teach at South Texas during the 2004-2005 academic year as the Spurgeon Bell Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law.

May 22. Retiring Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas R. Phillips was the commencement speaker at graduation.

June. South Texas students were awarded first place at the 2004 State Bar of Texas Moot Court Competition, held in San Antonio. The winning team consisted of Nichole James, Taneka Johnson, and Paige Woodard.

July 27. The college’s newly developed Corporate Compliance Center began operation with Professor Paul McGreal at the helm as its founding director. It is one of five centers of excellence identified in the strategic plan adopted by the South Texas Board of Directors in February. The center’s mission is to provide attorneys, businesspeople, and the South Texas College of Law community with a timely education in and the latest reference materials on corporate compliance.

August 17. Professor Helen Bishop Jenkins was named vice-president and associate dean for Academic Administration.

August 18. Professor Shelby A. D. Moore was named the college’s first President’s Research Professor.

September 16. Lisa Blue (1980) was honored as Distinguished Alumna of the Year at the annual meeting of the Alumni Association.

September 23. The John W. Turner Lecture on Professionalism, held in Garrett-Townes Hall, featured John Dugard, professor of Public International Law at the University of Leiden.

October 14. In a special dedication ceremony honoring Frank G. Evans, retired chief justice of the 1st Court of Appeals, the Center for Legal Responsibility was renamed the Frank Evans Center for Conflict Resolution.  Known as the “father of alternative dispute resolution in Texas,” Evans is the founding director of the center.  The event was held in conjunction with the 5th Annual Institute for Responsible Dispute Resolution, a two-day seminar that took place on October 14-15.

October 18. South Texas advocates won their 88th national title as they took top honors at the John Marshall Law School International Moot Court Competition in Information Technology and Privacy Law, held in Chicago.  South Texas also received the award for the best written brief. Team members were Angela Hamilton, Jason Newman, and Ryan Dry.

October 25. South Texas advocates competed against their teammates at the final round of the State Bar of Texas Administrative Law Moot Court Competition, thus winning both first and second place. The winning team consisted of Magnus Rayos, Dianne Scott, and Brant Stogner.  Stogner was also named the best speaker of the competition.  South Texas’s second place team consisted of Hilary Greene, Kate Harrison, and Justin Keiter, and South Texas also won the award for best written brief as well.

November. South Texas students collected top honors at the American Medical Association-sponsored National Health Law Moot Court Competition. The winning team consisted of Darla Canon, Marianne Green, and Carrie Martin. Martin was also named best speaker of the competition. This was the 89th national advocacy title earned by the college.

November 9. South Texas graduate David Medina (1989) was appointed the newest member of the Supreme Court of Texas in an announcement made by Texas Governor Rick Perry in the college’s T. Gerald Treece Courtroom. Medina, who is the first South Texas graduate to serve on the state’s highest court, has taught at South Texas as an adjunct professor, has served as an alumni mentor, and was an outstanding advocate as a student.

November 12. The South Texas Law Review celebrated its 50th anniversary with a reception in the Slohm Room of the Fred Parks Law Library.

November 17. The Godwin Gruber law firm, based in Dallas, established the Godwin Gruber Research Professorship at South Texas College of Law, with Professor Shelby A. D. Moore as its first recipient.  The firm recently established a Houston office, and in the process hired many South Texas alums, including Bob Dunn (1965), Dan King (1982), Amy Dunn Taylor (1982), David Holman (1985), and Andrew Sarne (1996).

November 20.  South Texas won the National Civil Trial Competition Invitational, sponsored by Loyola Law School and held in Los Angeles, California. Student advocates Daniel Dutko and Katie Taylor were also co-winners of the best speaker award.  This victory was the 90th national title in the school’s history.

December 18.  Supreme Court of Texas Associate Justice Dale Wainwright was the commencement speaker at the fall graduation ceremony in front of eighty-eight graduates at the Hilton Americas Hotel.

^Top^

2005 – Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals visits STCL

February 17 – Reception honoring Chief Justice Wallace B. Jefferson and the Harris County Judiciary held on the 6th floor of the Library.

March 7 & 8 – The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments in the T. Gerald Treece Courtroom on the following cases: United States of America v. Teresa De Jesus-Batres et al; Charles Blakely, et al v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance co.; Keith Jordan v. Doug Dretha, etc.; Harry T. Keane, Jr. v. Fox TV Stations Inc., et al; United States of America v. Terry Ray Pennell; Lauro Aguirre v. U.S. parole Commission; RLI Insurance Co v. Wainoco Oil & Gas Co, et al.; White Buffalo Ventures LLC v. University of Texas at Austin;

March 10 – Professor Barry Scheck, renowned DNA expert, was the Fred Parks Distinguished Lecturer; Sheck is the co-director of the Innocence Project and taught law at the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law.  He was joined by a panel of experts discussing the use of DNA and issues that many in law enforcement in Houston face with the embattled Houston police crime lab.

April 1 – The Fred Parks Law Library’s collection reached the 500,000 mark.
 
April 4 – STCL wins the ABA national Moot Court Competition, bringing the total of national wins to 91.

April 8 – US News & World Reports annual rankings of graduate schools puts STCL at number one in teaching trial advocacy.

April 8 – South Texas Law Review presented Judge & Jury – a seminar on the allocation of judicial power between the jury and the judge.  Discussions were led by moderators Judge Abner Mikva and Judge Patrick Higginbotham.  Joe Jamail spoke at the luncheon.

April 27 – Senator John Edwards spoke at STCL about the Center for Poverty, Work, and Opportunity, located at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

May 7 – The STCL alumni gala was held at the Hilton-Americas in downtown Houston. This year the gala was a tribute to three individuals who demonstrated unique support to the college: Judge Philip Baldwin, his brother attorney Scott Baldwin, and their cousin attorney Franklin Jones, Jr.  CBS news anchor and former STCL student Dan Rather paid tribute to Judge Baldwin at the gala.

May 21 – The Honorable Carolyn D. King, Chief Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit was the commencement speaker.

June – Michael Hays (class of ’74) joined the STCL Board of Directors.

August 29 – Michael Hays (’74) named partner of Hays, McConn, Rice & Pickering, P.C. is named Distinguished Alumnus.

September/October – The STCL community hosted several relief drives in order to raise $10,000 for victims of Hurricane Katrina.  Tuition and fees were waived for more than 30 displaced law students from Tulane and Loyola.

September 16 – STCL and its student American Civil Liberties Union organization held their first annual Banned Book reading to coincide with National Banned Books Week.

October 21 – The Fred Parks Law Library celebrates the acquisition of its 500,000th volume on Founder’s Day with guest speaker Joseph McKnight of the SMU Dedman School of Law.

October 27 – The John Turner Lecture on professionalism featured Kendall M. Gray, who spoke on his book All I Really Need to Know about Ethics I Learned in Kindergarten.  A panel discussion, Civility in the Legal Profession, followed with Bob Dunn (’65), Richard P, Hogan, Jr. (’85), and the Honorable Eva Guzman (’89), Justice, 14th Court of Appeals.

December 16 – Four new members were elected to STCL board of Directors: Otway B. Denny, Jr, a partner in the Houston offices of Fulbright & Jaworski; Lynette K. Fons, of Counsel at Beirne Maynard & Parsons LLP and president of the STCL Alumni Association; Judge Carolyn Dineen king, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit; and Thomas R. Phillips, a partner in the Austin offices of Baker Botts LLP and former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas
.
December 17 – The Honorable David Medina, Supreme Court of Texas, was the commencement speaker.

December 20 – STCL formalized a U.S.-Sino Education Exchange Center with the Law School of Shandong University at Weihei, China. The Center facilitates faculty and student exchange between the two schools.

^Top^

2006 – In memoriam Professor Charles Weigel, II

February 20 – South Texas Advocates bring home national win #92 from the William B. Spong Invitational Moot Court Tournament.

February 23 – Kinky Friedman gave a speech about his current run for Governor followed by a questions and answer session.

February 28 – Raymond Brown and Wanda Akin, International Trial Attorneys, Human Rights Activists and Teachers visit STCL for How Could you Represent Those People?: An Age Old Questions in an International Forum sponsored by the Teacher Development Committee.

March 2 – The Fred Parks Distinguished Lecturer, Professor Marc Galanter talked on Legal Education in the Time of Antilawyerism.

March 22 – Students Lindsey Fincher and Matthew Laudone win the ABA Law Student Division National Client Counseling Competition.  They went on to represent the USA at the International Client Counseling Competition at the Cardiff Law School.

The Frank Evans Center for Conflict Resolution sign agreements of cooperation with the Supreme Court of Panama, the Panama Canal Authority, the City of Knowledge, and the international Center for Sustaubake Development pledging to work cooperatively with these governmental and non-governmental entities.  The purpose of the agreements is to analyze and develop ways conflict resolution methods can be applied to judicial, contractual, social and environmental issues.

April 3 – STCL wins national title #93 from the Association of Trial Lawyers of American Student Trial Advocacy Competition.

April 10 – STCL wins national title #94 from the National products Liability moot Court Competition.

May 20 – US Secretary of Energy Sam Bodman gave the commencement speech at graduation.

July 18 – The Lylene Pilkenton Scholarship was established in honor of STCL’s college registrar and assistant Dean by Neal Hirschfeld ’80. 

August 23 – Roland Garcia ’86, named Distinguished Alumnus.

September 22 – Defending Al-Qaeda: A View from the Trenches of Guantanamo. Captain John Merriam, U.S. Army Defense Counsel for Omar Khadr, Guantanamo detainee, discusses his job, his views, and his stories about working with detainees. 

September 29 – Stanley is launched!  The STCL portal gives users access to secured information on the intranet.

December 13 – Memorial service held for Professor Charles J. Weigel II.  Professor Weigel joined the faculty in 1967 when he was the Spurgeon E. Bell Distinguished professor of Law.  He taught courses in legal medicine, hospital law, torts, property, family law, and international law. 

December 16 – Donald W. Washington ’89, US Attorney, Western District of Louisiana gives the commencement speech at graduation.

^Top^

2007 – In memoriam Professor Hans Lawton

David W. Holman ’85 is named Distinguished Alumnus.

March 8 – the Fred Parks Distinguished Lecturer was Philip D. Shelton.  His lecture was entitled Legal Education: A Report Card.

March 28 – The STCL Alumni Association held a free career development seminar entitled Planning fore Partnership and Considering Your Options, including a Graceful Exit.

March 29 – STCL partnered with The Anti-Defamation League – southwest region and Thompson & Knight LLP to present religion ion Public Schools and the Community.

April 7 – The Alumni gala honored Judge Robert Eckels ’93.

April 27 – Professor R. Hanson Lawton passed away.  Professor Lawton came to STCL in 1983.  He specialized in Corporations and Alternative Dispute Resolutions and served as the executive director of the Frank G. Evans Center for Conflict Resolution. 

Ma y 19 – The Honorable Wallace B. Jefferson, Chief Justice, Supreme Court of Texas, gives the commencement speech at graduation.

November – STCL Board of Advocates bring home national wins #97 and 98.

December 16 – The Honorable Dan Gattis, Texas House of Representatives, gives the commencement speech at graduation.

^Top^

2008 – Dean Jim Alfini announces his retirement

January – Three new members join the South Texas College of Law Board of Directors: Ronald C. Lewis, Gordon J. Quan, and L. Jeffery Steen.

Professor Dale Carpenter is the inaugural Fred Parks Distinguished Chair. 

March 10 – STCL Board of Advocates brings home national title #99 with a win at the Judge John R. Brown Admiralty law Moot Court Competition.

March 26 – Dean James J. Alfini announced he will step down as Dean and president at the end of the 2008/2009 academic year.

April 5 – The South Texas College of Law Advocates claim their 100th national title with a win a the 21st Annual August A. Rendigs, Jr. National Products Liability Moot Court Competition.

May 17 – Commencement speaker is Richard Anderson ’82, CEO of Delta Airlines.
September – Elaine Carlson is chosen as the Distinguished Alumna and is honored for 25 years of service to STCL.

September 13 - Hurricane Ike ravages the Gulf Coast

October 7 – STCL hosts the Texas Supreme Court Forum featuring all three incumbents and their challengers.

December 8 - Michael Hays begins his tenure as Chairman of South Texas College of Law Board of Directors.

Margaret B. Shannon joins the Board of Directors.

December 20 – Commencement speaker is Lynne Liberato ’80, partner at Haynes and Boone, LLP.



^Top^

 

 

2009 – Donald J. Guter announced as new President and Dean

January 20, 2009 – Students, faculty and staff gathered in Garrett-Townes Auditorium to watch the inauguration of President Barack Obama.

March 10 – The Supreme Court of Texas heard arguments in the Treece Courtroom.  There was also a question and answer session with students in Garratt-Townes Auditorium.

March 12 – Nancy H. Rogers delivers the Fred Parks Distinguished Lecture, “Should Law Make You Jaw? Using the law to encourage conversations between diverse groups of people.”

April 1 – Ed Smith, long time board member, passes away.

April 6 – Katie McFarland, Bridget Burke, and Stephanie Lindsey Holcombe win ABA Appellate Advocacy competition.

May 17 – Mayor Bill White gives the commencement speech.

June 23 – Bridget Burke, Stephanie Holcombe, and Justin Jenson win the Scribes award from the American Society of Legal Writers.

July 21 – Randy R. Howry names Distinguished Alumnus.

August  1 – Donald J. Guter begins as president and Dean of STCL.

August 27 – MBA Council of Houston hosted the Houston Mayoral Candidate Debate in the Garrett-Townes Auditorium.

October 16 – S. Shawn Stephens, ’88, elected president of the STCL Alumni Association

October 26 – Christopher Burt, Kaylan Estes, and Kimberly Jessett win the 16th Annual Wechsler First Amendment Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C.  This is the 102nd title earned by South Texas Advocates.

November 2-3  -The United States Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit heard oral arguments in the T. Gerald Treece Courtroom.

November 10 – Inauguration of Dean Donald J. Guter as 10th President and Dean of South Texas  College  of Law.

December – Gene L. Locke ’81, S. Shawn Stephens ’88, and James D, Thompson ’86, join the South Texas College of Law Board of Directors.

December 19 – Jeff Rusk, ’83, is the speaker at commencement.

^Top^

2010 In Memorium: Professor Richard J. Graving

February – The South Texas community donated $17,500 to help the American Red Cross earthquake relief efforts in Haiti.

February 26 – STCL hosted a viewing of “The Response,” a courtroom drama based on the transcripts of the Guantanamo Bay military tribunals.

April – Supreme Court of Texas Justice Eva Guzman ’89 joins the STCL Board of Directors.

April 10 – Roy Mitchell, Zachary Bowman and James Barnish win the ABA Moot Court Competition, and a team consisting of Christopher Burt, Ryan King and Andrew Nelson won for Best Brief.  This was the 104th win by the South Texas Advocates.

April 13 – South Texas real Estate Law Society presents an in depth look at the regulation of property use, property rights and growth in Houston.

April 16 – US News and World Report’s lists South Texas College of Law as the number 3 school in the country for trial advocacy.

April 19 – Professor Richard J. Graving passed away. Prof. Graving started teaching at South Texas in 1983 after a 30-year career in international law in the U.S. and abroad. He brought his experience, vast knowledge, and humor to the classrooms starting with first-year courses like contracts, to 3L courses in international law, touching thousands of lives.

May 23 – Elisa Massimino, CEO and executive Director of Human Rights First is the commencement speaker.

July 2 – South Texas Advocates Michael Jones, Stuart Ladner and Sabrina Stone win the Scribes Award for Best Brief from The American Society of Legal Writers.

August – Frank Evans retired from South Texas College of Law.

September – Ricahrd Anderson ’82 is named Distinguished Alumnus.

October 4 – the US Army Court of Criminal Appeals heard the appeal of Unites States v. Figueroamarcial in Garrett-Townes Auditorium.

October 19 – Journey of Hope, an anti-death penalty organization, give a presentation.  Speakers include David Kaczynski, brother of unibomber Ted Kaczynski.

December 18 – Randy Sorrels, ’87, is the commencement speaker.

^Top^

2011 – Lylene Pilkenton retires

February 23 – STCL co-hosts ‘our World at War: Photojournalism beyond the Front Lines,’ an exhibit of 40 photographs taken by 5 award winning photographers in eight countries where there was conflict.

March 9 – The South Texas College of Law Diversity Teaching Institute drew more than 40 participants to discuss how to encourage diversity lawyers to seek opportunities to teach.

March 10 – Panel discussion, ‘The ICRC and the Military: A tradition of Mutual Respect,’ held in Garrett-Townes Auditorium. The discussion focused on how both organizations interact to mitigate the human suffering associated with armed conflict.

March 24 – STCL hosted a field hearing for the United States House Subcommittee on energy and Power, entitled “EPA’s Greenhouse Gas and Clean Air Act Regulations: A Focus on Texas’ economy, Energy Prices and Jobs.”

March 28 – Students Xocytl Greer, Amrita Boghani and Marium Siddiqul won the International Law School Mediation Tournament, held at the BPP Law School in London.

April 12 – the STCL community raised over $4000 to donate to Japanese relief efforts following q devastating tsunami.

May 10 – South Texas College of Law joins Washburn School of Law in partnership with the United States Agency for International Development in support of Georgian legal education.  STCL will focus on Alternative Dispute Resolution at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University Faculty of Law.

May 21 – Houston Mayor Annise Parker is the commencement speaker.

October 13 – Attorney General Eric Holder visited STCL to discuss what lawyers can do to close the justice gap.

October 24 – Advocates win #109 as Caroline Ballard, John Crump and Iran Guerrero win the National Civil Rights Mock trial Competition.

October 25 – Houston Area Chapters of the Black law Students Association, and the STCL Chapters of the Hispanic law students Association and Asian and Pacific American Law Students association hosted ‘Minorities in Politics: Navigating the Political Arena.’

December 17 – James W. Houck, Vice Admiral, United States Navy Judge Advocate General, is the commencement speaker.

 



 

Freshman Class of 1923-24
South Texas Freshman Class of 1923-1924

T Gerald Treece Courtroom
T. Gerald Treece Courtroom completed in 2003

  Quick Links


South Texas College of Law · 1303 San Jacinto Street, Houston, Texas 77002 · 713-659-8040
Please send comments or questions to: webmaster@s
tcl.edu